Friday, September 19, 2014

2014 Wildlife Expo Promises Plenty of Outdoor Fun

Have you ever tried tossing an atlatl? How about goose-knocking? Or flint knapping? You'll have
your chance to experience all of those outdoors at the 2014 Oklahoma Wildlife Expo.
   Presented by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the free event will take place from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 28, at the Lazy E Arena, just north of Oklahoma City.
   "Your whole family will be able to see and do so many things outside on the Expo grounds," said Rhonda Hurst, coordinator of the event for the Wildlife Department. "From outdoor skills to wildlife education to fishing or just plain fun, our activities planned outside the arena are going to be some real crowd-pleasers!"
   The atlatl is a type of spear that is launched over the shoulder using an ancient technique. Expo visitors will have an opportunity to try their hand at tossing the atlatl, just as ancient hunters did thousands of years ago.
   Youngsters will get a kick out of goose-knocking, in which they try to knock over metal goose silhouettes by throwing a stick at them. And everyone will marvel at the skill of flint knappers, folks who create points and tools from stones right before your eyes!
   As always, children and adults will be able to wet a line in the stocked fishing pond as part of a Wildlife Department Family Fishing Clinic. Other fishing-related activities will be found outside, including a fishing lure make-n-take, basic fly-fishing instruction, tying fishing knots and fish cleaning seminars.
   Bowfishing also makes a comeback for 2014! Guests will be able to try their hand shooting at simulated fish targets in the pond.
   Many highly popular activities at Expo involve the shooting sports. Visitors will find outdoor areas devoted to archery, pellet gun shooting and slingshot shooting. The Wildlife Department's Shotgun Training Education Program will set up a range where guests can try to shoot a flying clay target with a shotgun.
   "The Expo's outdoor offerings will also include plenty of craft booths and wildlife conservation-related activities where guests can learn about our outdoor heritage," Hurst said.
   Activity booths will include basketweaving make-n-take, bullet casting, bluebird house make-n-take, rope making, wildlife bling make-n-take, play in the sand, monkey bridge, ride a utility vehicle, mountain bikes, tent camping basics and dog training area.
   Several venues will focus on wildlife, including the watchable wildlife seminar tent, birding optics course, bird feeding station, Texas horned lizard corral, furs and skulls booth and watchable wildlife area. And don't be surprised if the wonderful aroma of baking biscuits leads you to the Camp Cookin' in the Heartland site, where experts will be using Dutch ovens in campfires to rustle up some mighty tasty grub!
   All of these things and more will be found outside on the grounds around the Lazy E Arena. But don't forget about the dozens of booths and activities that you can explore inside, too! And it's all free.
   For more information and a list of activities you'll find at the 2014 Wildlife Expo, go online to wildlifedepartmentexpo.com.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Michigan duck stamps and prints available now

The Michigan Duck Hunters Association, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, introduces the 2014 collector-edition Michigan duck stamp and prints.
2014 Michigan duck stampThe Michigan Duck Stamp Program, established in 1976, has become an icon for waterfowl hunters and wetland conservation enthusiasts. During the past 38 years, the program has gained popularity with collectors and conservation groups throughout the United States.
The Michigan Duck Hunters Association coordinates the Michigan waterfowl stamp program in partnership with the DNR. MDHA is a nonprofit organization dedicated to waterfowl and wetland conservation. Proceeds from stamp sales will be used to fund MDHA projects, with 10 percent used to match DNR funding for purchasing wetlands.
The 2014 Michigan duck stamp features a pair of long-tailed ducks in flight, painted by Christopher Smith, a wildlife artist from Suttons Bay, Michigan. This is Smith’s second Michigan Duck Stamp Contest victory. He won first place in 2005 and second place in 2012. Smith was also named Michigan Ducks Unlimited Sponsor Artist of the Year in 2009 and 2014.
The purchase of Michigan waterfowl stamps and prints helps to ensure continued wetlands acquisition and habitat programs. Purchase of these collector-edition stamps is voluntary and does not replace the state waterfowl hunting license. MDHA will mail individuals who purchase a 2014 waterfowl hunting license a free copy of the stamp (subject to availability) if they send a self-addressed, stamped envelope with a copy of their Michigan waterfowl hunting license to:

    Michigan Duck Hunters Association
    Waterfowl Stamp Program
    P.O. Box 20, Midland, MI 48640
The Michigan duck stamp should not to be confused with the Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (also known as the Federal Duck Stamp), which is required for waterfowl hunting.
The 2014-15 waterfowl hunting season continues the celebration of the Michigan Waterfowl Legacy, a 10-year, cooperative partnership to restore, conserve and celebrate Michigan's waterfowl, wetlands and waterfowl hunting community. For more information, visitwww.michigan.gov/mwl.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Duck Blind Permit Drawings to Begin Saturday

  A couple of late-summer cool fronts have surely made a few waterfowl hunters anxious for the upcoming seasons. And for many, part of the preparation is to attend the annual drawings for permanent duck blind permits at several lakes across Oklahoma.
   Duck blind permit drawings for the five U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lakes where permanent blinds are allowed will be Saturday, Sept. 20. Drawings for blind sites at Lake Overholser/Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper in Oklahoma City will be held Saturday, Sept. 27.
   Duck season in Oklahoma will open Oct. 11 in the Panhandle counties, Oct. 25 in Zone 1 (northwestern areas), and Nov. 1 in Zone 2 (southern and eastern areas).
   Blind drawing locations, times and dates are:
 
Fort Gibson Lake
When: Sept. 20; registration, 7 a.m.; drawing, 8 a.m.
Where: Oklahoma Wildlife Department's Porter Office, 1.5 miles north of the Muskogee Turnpike on U.S. 69.
Eufaula Reservoir
When: Sept. 20; registration, 9:30 a.m.; drawing, 10:30 a.m.
Where: Oklahoma Wildlife Department's Porter Office, 1.5 miles north of the Muskogee Turnpike on U.S. 69.
Webbers Falls Reservoir (Lock and Dam 16)
When: Sept. 20; registration, noon; drawing, 1 p.m.
Where: Oklahoma Wildlife Department's Porter Office, 1.5 miles north of the Muskogee Turnpike on U.S. 69.
W.D. Mayo (Lock and Dam 14)
When: Sept. 20; registration, 10 a.m., drawing to follow promptly.
Where: Spiro City Hall, 510 S. Main St.
Waurika Lake
When: Sept. 20; registration, 9 a.m., drawing to follow promptly.
Where: Waurika Lake Project Office.          
Contact: Kent Swanda, (580) 595-0347.
Fort Supply Lake
When: Sept. 20; 8 to 9 a.m., first-come, first-served.
Where: Oklahoma Wildlife Department's Woodward Office, 3014 Lakeview Drive.
Contact: Eddie Wilson, (580) 334-0343.
Canton Lake
When: Sept. 20; 8 to 10 a.m., first-come, first-served.
Where: Overlook Café, south end of Canton Lake dam.
Contact: Thad Potts, (580) 541-5319.
Lakes Draper and Overholser/Stinchcomb
When: Sept. 27, 1:30 p.m.
Where: Lake Draper Marina Concession Facility, 8301 SE 104 St.
Note: Drawing for Draper sites will be held first. Oklahoma City hunting permits will be sold to drawing winners.
Contact: Overholser Patrol Station, (405) 789-3746 or Draper Marina, (405) 799-0870.
   Applicants for permanent blind permits must be at least 16 years of age and possess all valid hunting licenses, signed stamps and permits as required for hunting waterfowl during the waterfowl season, unless exempt. Additionally, applicants need a valid Harvest Information Program (HIP) Permit. Applicants must be present at the drawings to be eligible.
   Waterfowl hunting blinds built on Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs are classified in two categories: temporary blinds (constructed for only one hunt and removed at the end of the hunt) and permanent blinds (constructed for seasonal use). No permit is required for temporary blinds.
   Lakes where temporary duck blinds are allowed, along with other details about duck blind use, are listed in the "Oklahoma Waterfowl" regulations guide, which is available online at wildlifedepartment.com or from license vendors across the state.

Lewis and Clark Recreation Area to Host Fall Event

YANKTON, S.D. – Lewis and Clark Recreation Area near Yankton is hosting Fall in the Park at Lewis and Clark Saturday, Sept. 20, from 1-5 p.m. CDT.
The new fall event will include a number of activities including an obstacle course, outdoor cooking, crafts, games, laser shot, BB gun shooting and archery.
Visitors can also enjoy music by Steel Groove, a steel drum group, from 3 to 5 p.m.
“This is the first year of a fall event for Lewis and Clark,” said event organizer Jeanne Schroeder. “We hope to provide an afternoon of entertainment for all age groups.”
There is no charge to attend the event; however, a park entrance license is required to enter the park. Daily entrance is $6 per vehicle.
Lewis and Clark Recreation Area is located 6 miles west of Yankton of SD Highway 52.
For more information, call 605-668-2985.

Youth Waterfowl Weekend is Sept. 20-21

English: crop of File:Bgforhunting.jpg Taken b...
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
North Dakota’s two-day youth waterfowl season is Sept. 20-21. Legally licensed resident and nonresident youth waterfowl hunters age 15 and younger may hunt ducks, geese, coots and mergansers statewide.
The daily bag limit and species restrictions for the youth season are the same as for regular duck and goose seasons. Exception: the additional two blue-winged teal allowed during the first 16 days of the regular season are not allowed during the youth season.
Resident and qualifying nonresident youth waterfowl hunters must possess a general game and habitat license and a fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate. Nonresidents from states that do not provide a reciprocal licensing agreement for North Dakota residents must purchase the entire nonresident waterfowl license package.
In addition, all youth hunters must be Harvest Information Program certified, and youth ages 12 and older need to have passed a certified hunter education course. Hunters age 15 and younger do not need a federal duck stamp.
Hunters who purchase a license through the North Dakota Game and Fish Department can easily get HIP certified. Otherwise, hunters must call 888-634-4798, or log on to the Game and Fish website at gf.nd.gov, and record the HIP number on their fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate.
Shooting hours for the youth waterfowl season are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. An adult of at least 18 years of age must accompany the resident youth hunter into the field, and a licensed adult is required to accompany a nonresident youth hunter. The two-day weekend hunt does not count against a nonresident adult hunter’s 14-day regular season waterfowl dates.

Michigan state parks celebrate fall with harvest festivals

Looking at the sign for Fort Wilkins Historic ...
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
As temperatures begin to cool down and summer camping transitions into fall camping, more than 30 Michigan state parks and recreation areas are preparing their fall harvest festivals. These events feature fall-themed, family-oriented activities such as pumpkin carving, costume contests, trick-or-treating and much more. Each park puts its own personal spin on the celebrations, so no two events are exactly the same.

Below are just a few upcoming harvest festivals that may still have camping availability. Events marked with an asterisk (*) are for registered campers only:
 Sept. 20 
 Sept. 26-27
  • Proud Lake Recreation Area* - hay rides, games, campsite decorating, trick-or-treating and more 
  • Wells State Park* - a variety of Halloween-themed activities, including pumpkin painting, horse-drawn carriage rides 
 Sept. 26-28
 Sept. 27 
Sept. 27-28
  • Brimley State Park* - a haunted house and many more seasonal activities (only the haunted house is open to non-campers)
Oct. 3-4 
Oct. 3-5 
Oct. 4
Oct. 4-5
  • Aloha State Park - kids' activities, trick-or-treating, chili cook-off and site decorating, sponsored by Fernelius Auto Group
  • Brimley State Park* - a haunted house and many more seasonal activities (only the haunted house is open to non-campers)
 For information about a specific event, please visit the online Calendar of Events or contact the park directly. To see a full list of fall harvest festivals, visit www.michigan.gov/gogetoutdoors, and select “Harvests and Haunts."

Most harvest festival activities are free for registered campers, and some are open to the public, but a Recreation Passport is required, and camping fees apply. To check camping availability and make a reservation, visit www.midnrreservations.com or call 1-800-447-2757.
A Recreation Passport is required for any motor vehicle entering a Michigan state park, boat launch, state forest campground or nonmotorized state trailhead parking. Residents can purchase the Passport for just $11 ($5 for motorcycles) at the time of Michigan license plate renewal through Secretary of State. Forgot to check “YES” during renewal? Residents and nonresidents can purchase a Recreation Passport window sticker during regular business hours at state parks. Learn more about how the Recreation Passport supports state parks and local outdoor recreation opportunities at www.michigan.gov/recreationpassport.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Outdoor News from Michigan 6/12/2014

Purple loosestrife is an invasive plant deemed...
Purple loosestrife is an invasive plant deemed harmful to the watershed. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Here is the weekly fishing report for 6/12/2104

Michigan DNR is encouraging residents to become familiar with the wide variety of snakes the occupy Michigan.  There are a total of 17 species, and according to DNR, 16 of those pose no threat to humans.  In fact snakes play a pivotal role in many important facets of the ecosystem.  To learn  more about the snakes in Michigan, visit HERE.

"Stewarship Volunteers" are playing a helpful role in helping take care of public areas around Michigan, such as helping identify and removing invasive plant species.  These volunteers roles are honored in the story Stewardship volunteers give back to state parks


Saturday, June 7, 2014

Public invited to provide input on new Kirtland’s Warbler Conservation Plan

In 1966, the Kirtland’s warbler was listed as a federally endangered species; today, history is being made as this unique songbird may soon be delisted.

Kirtland's warbler in jack pine treeThe Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service signed a memorandum of understanding in June 2011 to clarify each agency’s commitment to the conservation of the Kirtland’s warbler. Due to the potential for delisting, the three agencies decided it was necessary to develop a Kirtland’s Warbler Conservation Plan (KWCP) that would provide future strategic guidance to sustain a viable population of Kirtland’s warblers across their breeding range.

The current habitat and brown-headed cowbird management programs have been successful in addressing the major threats to Kirtland’s warblers, and the KWCP will help transition management from the recovery phase to the new focus on long-term population sustainability. Kirtland’s warbler breeding habitat in northern Michigan is developed through timber harvest and reforestation, and annual control of cowbirds is required to prevent Kirtland’s warbler nest parasitism. The KWCP will provide goals and technical guidance to managers and others on how to create and maintain breeding habitat and control cowbirds, ensuring long-term survival for the Kirtland’s warbler.

Those who would like to provide input on the plan are invited to either:
  • Email their comments to DNR-Wildlife@michigan.gov before July 28; or
  • Attend a public meeting July 9 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Grayling Nature Center, 100 South James St. in Grayling. A formal presentation about the history of the Kirtland’s warbler will be given starting at 5 p.m., and comments and questions will be received until 7 p.m. 
“We will be revising the KWCP every 10 years to incorporate new information and science,” said DNR endangered species coordinator Dan Kennedy. “We hope all parties who have an interest in Kirtland’s warbler and the new plan will stop by the public meeting or send us a comment via email.”
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Friday, June 6, 2014

Collaborative Science Projects to Benefit Fish, Wildlife and Communities of Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Fish, wildlife and communities of the upper Midwest and Great Lakes will benefit from leading
Aurora borealis at Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge.
Photo courtesy of Bryan Worth.
edge science projects that aim to inform on-the-ground conservation efforts and natural resource management across the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region.
The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC), a partnership of more than 30 agencies and organizations vested in long-term sustainability of our natural resources and regional communities, announced funding for new and ongoing research projects that aim to connect science with land and water resource managers and policymakers.
“Our partnership is founded on a collaborative approach to problem-solving. Working together across federal, state and non-governmental lines, we are identifying, and filling, key gaps in our collective body of scientific knowledge. By leveraging our resources, we are more equipped to respond to the natural resources challenges of today, and to build and improve upon the decision-support tools future generations will need tomorrow,” said Dave Scott, Assistant Regional Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and LCC Steering Committee co-chair.
The upper Midwest and Great Lakes are home to a diverse range of fish, wildlife and plants supported by the Great Lakes, North America’s largest freshwater resource, coastal wetlands, major rivers, boreal forests and prairie-hardwood ecosystems. Many of these ecosystems surround heavily populated urban centers. Physical and social stressors like climate change, energy development, water demands, invasive species and the demands to support a growing human population are all threatening the ecological integrity of the region.
New research projects receiving 2014 LCC funding include:
Developing a Decision Support System for Prioritization and Restoration of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands – Central Michigan University
By leveraging recently collected coastal wetland monitoring data, a basin-wide coastal wetland prioritization tool will be developed to help wetland managers across the Great Lakes basin prioritize, protect and restore coastal wetlands.
Climate Change Impacts on Wisconsin’s Natural Communities and Conservation Opportunities Areas: Updating Wisconsin’s Wildlife Action Plan - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
State Wildlife Action Plans are important conservation planning tools for state natural resource agencies. Natural resource experts will develop detailed climate change vulnerability assessments for natural communities in Wisconsin, and work to integrate valuable information on climate change impacts and natural communities into the State Wildlife Action Plan.
Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer on Black Ash Forests in the Upper Great Lakes Region - University of Minnesota
The emerald ash borer poses a tremendous threat to ash forest across the upper Great Lakes. This project will increase understanding of the potential regional impacts of emerald ash borer on black ash forest and associated wildlife by leveraging funding and existing research experiments and field trials located across Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
Implementing a Conservation Design with Many Landowners in the Chicago Wilderness Region - Audubon Society
An expansive network of citizen scientists, volunteer land stewards, public land management agencies and non-governmental organizations have pioneered sustainable grassland restoration and management work in the Chicago area, benefiting grassland bird communities on both public and private land. Statistical models of grassland bird distributions and grassland cover will be developed and integrated with Chicago Wilderness’ Green Infrastructure Vision to provide a more holistic and integrated approach to conservation planning and achieving natural resource objectives.
Collaborative Restoration of Aquatic Resources in the South Central Lake Superior Basin -Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
A collaborative geo-database of inventoried connectivity barriers within the South Central Superior Basin will be used to prioritize restoration for approximately 1,800 inventoried stream crossings. This pilot landscape conservation design project will contribute to the LCCs ongoing aquatic connectivity initiative by prioritizing restoration projects within regionalized watersheds. A suite of current remote sensing tools, including light detection and ranging technologies, will be used to target restoration and management needs to meet multiple natural resource objectives.
Ongoing projects receiving 2014 LCC funding include:
  • Developing Fish Trophic Interaction Indicators of Climate Change for the Great Lakes - U.S. Geological Survey – Great Lakes Science Center
  • Regional Risk Assessment for Climate Vulnerable Terrestrial Species - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and University of Wisconsin
  • Optimizing Connectivity in the Great Lakes Basin to Restore Native Fish Migrations While Controlling Invasive Species - University of Wisconsin – Center for Limnology
  • Assessment of Waterfowl Habitat Restoration as an Adaptive Mechanism for Water Sustainability in the Grand Kankakee River Watershed - University of Notre Dame
  • Integrated Models for Estimating Influences of Climate Change on Waterfowl Populations, Waterfowl Habitat, and Hunter Opportunity and Demographics - Ducks Unlimited
For complete information on all new and ongoing research projects supported by the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC, visithttp://greatlakeslcc.org/research-projects/
The grants totaling $755,000 were funded in part by the President’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative; an interagency effort led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. For more information on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service activities related specifically to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, please visithttp://www.fws.gov/GLRI
The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC envisions a conservation community that while governed by their unique purposes and missions, collaborates on sustaining lands and waters that support natural and cultural resources and the services they provide. Our mission is to support and sustain this conservation community by facilitating communication, coordination and collaboration to bridge cutting-edge scientific research with natural resources management. For more information, visit http://www.GreatLakesLCC.org
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Thursday, June 5, 2014

Oklahoma Fishing Report

English: Flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris)

CENTRAL

Arcadia: June 2. Elevation above normal, water murky. Fishing is very sporadic, one day may be good and the next slow. Crappie slow on minnows and tube jigs at 1/2-7 ft. around docks, rocks and shorelines. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and jigs around docks and in the main lake; smaller bass are being caught by people fishing for crappie. Channel and blue catfish slow on cut bait, punch bait and stinkbait around points, coves and shorelines. Report submitted by Vince Mesis, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Draper: June 3. Elevation above normal, water 70. Crappie fair on tube jigs, minnows around brush structure, shorelines and docks. Report submitted by Chad Strang, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

Hefner: June 2. Elevation below normal, water 70-74. Channel and blue catfish good on punch bait, stinkbait and live bait at 2-8 ft. along inlets, points and rocks. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits, buzz baits and jigs at 3-6 ft. along rocks. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. around docks and rocks. White bass, striped bass hybrids and walleye good on minnows, grubs and gay blades at 3-8 ft. around docks, rocks and the inlet. Report submitted by Lucky Lure Tackle.

Overholser: June 3. Elevation normal, water 71. Striped bass hybrids slow on sassy shad in the main lake. Blue and flathead catfish slow on shad in the main lake. Report submitted by Jerrod Davis, game warden stationed in Oklahoma and Canadian counties.

Thunderbird: June 3. Elevation below normal, water 70. Crappie and white bass good on minnows and jigs around docks, shallows and brush structure. Saugeye fair on crankbaits and plastic baits around points and rocks. Channel and blue catfish fair on cut bait in channels and around rocks. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits, topwater lures and spinnerbaits along flats, weed beds and standing timber. Report submitted by Chad Strang, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

Wes Watkins: June 3. Elevation below normal. White bass fair on crankbaits and topwater lures in the main lake. Channel and blue catfish good on stinkbait and worms along shallows. Report submitted by Mike France, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County.

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 78. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around rocks and docks. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, worms, stinkbait and hotdogs around docks, shorelines, shallows and the west end of the lake. Largemouth bass good on small lures, spinnerbaits, plastic baits and sassy shad along weed beds and standing timber. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Chandler: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 78. Crappie good on minnows and hair jigs around docks and shorelines. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits and crankbaits at 6-8 ft. along weed beds and the main lake. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, stinkbait and minnows along shallows and the dam. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County. 

Copan: June 1. Elevation normal, water 73. Crappie slow on minnows and tube jigs at 2-5 ft. along shorelines, creek channels and brush structure. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Ft. Gibson: May 31. Elevation above normal, water 75. Crappie good on minnows, jigs, small lures and small shad colored crankbaits at 6 ft. around brush structure and shallows. White bass slow on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and grubs at 6 ft. around points, shallows, trolling and the main lake. Blue, channel and flathead catfish excellent on live shad, shrimp and worms at 5-15 ft. in the main lake, along flats and shallows. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and plastic baits at 3-5 ft. along weed beds, shallows and coves. Report submitted by Rick Stafford in Wagoner, Okla.

Grand: June 2. Elevation normal. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish good on fresh cut bait shallow. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa.

Greenleaf: June 3. Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 72 and clear. Largemouth bass good on chartreuse/white spinnerbaits, crankbaits, worms and jigs in creek channels, around brush structure and rocky points. Catfish good on fresh cut bait and stinkbait on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush structure mid-lake around islands. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hudson: June 3. Elevation above normal, water 72. Paddlefish slow below the dam. Largemouth bass good on buzz baits, topwater lures, spinnerbaits and plastic baits at 4-12 ft. around brush structure. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. in coves and around standing timber. Channel catfish slow on shad and shrimp at 8-20 ft. below the dam, tail water and points. Blue catfish good on cut bait and shad at 7-18 ft. below the dam and in the river channel. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes counties.

Hulah: June 1. Elevation normal, water 73. Crappie fair on minnows, hair jigs and tube jigs at 3-6 ft. around brush structure, coves and the main lake. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on cut bait, worms and chicken liver in the main lake and along shorelines. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Kaw: June 2. Elevation rising, water 72. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait and worms at 2-5 ft. along flats, shorelines and rocks staged in shallows to spawn and floating shrimp at 1-2 ft. around rocks. White bass and striped bass hybrids excellent on crankbaits, spoons, slabs and live shad at 5-15 ft. in the main lake, around points and riprap and trolling under bridges and main lake humps. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 3-12 ft. around brush structure and riprap. Walleye fair on crankbaits and live bait at 3-10 ft. below the dam, in shallows and around points. Some nice sized walleye are being caught on cloudy days using shallow running crankbaits on rocky points, and on live bait below the dam. Flathead catfish good on goldfish, sunfish and crawfish at 4-10 ft. along rocks. Flathead are gorging themselves in preparation for the spawn. Fish are being caught near the rocks all around the lake on rod-and-reel and on trotlines. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Kay County.

Keystone: June 3. Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 72. Catfish good on cut bait. Crappie fair on minnows. Report submitted by Karlin Bailey, game warden stationed in Creek County

Lower Illinois: June 2. Releasing one unit almost constantly except on weekends. Trout good on orange Power Bait and Rapalas. Fly fishing good in eddies and still water stripping wooly buggars. Report submitted by Jeremy Bersche, game warden stationed in Sequoyah County.

Oologah: Elevation normal, water 73. Blue and channel catfish good on shad at 5-10 ft. below the dam and around rocks. White bass fair on crankbaits at 10-15 ft. along flats. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at 3-6 ft. around rocks. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. around brush structure. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County.

Skiatook: June 1. Elevation below normal, water mid 70s and clear. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on live shad at 15-20 ft. in the main lake. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits at 5-10 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 5-15 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Webbers Falls: June 3. Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 76 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and bill baits along creek channels, rocky points and brush structure. Catfish good on fresh cut bait on bottom along mudflats and drifting. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in green and purple around structure. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

NORTHWEST

Canton: May 31. Elevation below normal, water 72. Crappie and white bass fair on minnows and jigs at 1-5 ft. along riprap. Channel catfish good on crickets and minnows at 2-8 ft. along riprap. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County.

Ft. Supply: June 2. Elevation normal. White bass fair on minnows and trolling all over the lake. Channel catfish good on cut bait and stinkbait at 15-20 ft. off the shorelines. Crappie fair on chartreuse jigs at the dam and jetties. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Woodward County.

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: May 31. Elevation below normal, water 74 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on spinnerbaits, topwater lures, jerk baits and swim baits at 4-12 ft. using long cast along flats, points and brush structure. Crappie and sunfish fair on minnows and white/chartreuse and white/blue jigs around brush structure. White bass good on jigs, spoons, lipless baits and topwater lures from surface to 10 ft. along flats and points and fair on topwater lures in open water chasing shad. Report submitted by Jack Melton. 

Blue River: June 3. Elevation normal, water 78 and murky. Smallmouth and spotted bass good on in-line spinnerbaits, tube jigs and grubs at 4-5 ft. around rocks, creek channels and below waterfalls. Channel catfish fair on minnows, chicken liver and stinkbait at 6-8 ft. in the river channel and around brush structure. Sunfish and bluegill good on grasshoppers, crickets, in-line spinnerbaits and grubs at 1-3 ft. in shallows. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: May 30. Elevation normal, water 72. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on flukes, crankbaits and plastic baits at 10-15 ft. around brush structure, standing timber and rocks. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, worms and stinkbait at 10-15 ft. in channels and mouth of the river. Crappie good on grubs, minnows and jigs at 15-20 ft. around standing timber and brush structure. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.
                          
Eufaula: June 1. Elevation normal, water 83 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits around points and rocky areas. White bass good on slab spoons at 20-30 ft. around standing rock and Duchess Creek area. Blue catfish good on a variety of baits in rocky spawning areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. around boat docks and standing timber. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County. 

Hugo: June 1. Elevation 1 ft. above normal. Tail water release have slowed. Catfish fair on cut bait below the dam and good on juglines and trotlines baited with cut bait and live sunfish in the main lake. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastics around brush. Crappie fair to good at 12-15 ft. around structure and trees in the main lake. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: June 3. Elevation normal, water 74. Largemouth bass excellent on plastic baits, topwater lures and in-line spinnerbaits at 2-6 ft. along rocks, shallows and weed beds. Channel and blue catfish good on chicken liver, shad, punch bait and worms around rocks, creek channels and the discharge. White bass and striped bass hybrids good on jigs, lipless baits, shad and slabs along creek channels, rocks and points. Report submitted by Tyler Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

Lower Mountain Fork: June 1. Elevation normal, water 58. Trout excellent on nymphs, midges and caddis flies along the spillway and rocks. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

McGee Creek: June 1. Elevation above normal, water 73. Flathead catfish good on sunfish at 6-14 ft. in coves. Channel catfish fair on cut bait at 10-20 ft. along riprap. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, plastic baits and spinnerbaits at 2-10 ft. along weed beds, standing timber and rocks. Crappie fair on minnows at 6-12 ft. around brush structure. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Murray: June 3. Elevation below normal, water 72. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on crankbaits, plastic baits and sassy shad at 3-7 ft. in coves, weed beds and rocks. Channel catfish good on worms, stinkbait and shrimp at 2-5 ft. along rocks and riprap. Crappie fair on minnows, jigs and small lures at 5-12 ft. around brush structure, rocks and docks. Sunfish and bluegill good on jigs, small lures, minnows and worms at 2-5 ft. in shallows, weed beds and docks. Sunfish species are still in spawning patterns, so look for beds in shallower water. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.

Pine Creek: June 1. Elevation above normal, water 65. Largemouth, spotted and white bass on Alabama rigs, worms and spinnerbaits at 8-12 ft. around points and creek channels. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-16 ft. around brush structure and shallows. Flathead catfish good on sunfish in creek channels. Channel catfish good on chicken liver around standing timber. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: June 2. Striped and white bass fair up the Canadian river with most catches being made when there is discharge from Eufaula dam. Bass good on flukes along weed beds and on diving baits around points. Crappie fair on trotlines and juglines baited with cut bait or live sunfish near river or creek channels. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Haskell County. 

Sardis: May 31. Elevation slightly above normal, water 75 and clear to murky. Largemouth and spotted bass good on Carolina-rigged spinnerbaits and swim baits at 6-14 ft. Channel and blue catfish good on cut bait and dead minnows. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at 6-14 ft. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 66. Largemouth and smallmouth bass excellent on crankbaits, jigs and plastic baits at 5-15 ft. in coves, creek channels and riprap. Channel and blue catfish excellent on worms, live bait, minnows and shrimp at 10-15 ft. along creek channels, riprap, shorelines and cleaning stations. Crappie and sunfish good on tub jigs, minnows and plastic baits at 5-15 ft. along shorelines, riprap and coves. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: June 1. Elevation above normal, water 70. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on bill baits, plastic baits and spinnerbaits at 3-6 ft. along brush structure, shorelines and creek channels. Crappie, bluegill and sunfish good on minnows and jigs at 4-9 ft. along creek channels and brush structure. Flathead catfish good on goldfish, sunfish and live bait at 10-12 ft. in the main lake, river mouth and channels. Channel and blue catfish good on chicken liver, cut bait and hotdogs at 10-12 ft. in creek channels and the main lake. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

SOUTHWEST

Ellsworth: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 73. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait and stinkbait. White bass fair on minnows, spinnerbaits and small lures along creek channels and rocks. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County.

Foss: May 29. Elevation 16 ft. below normal with gates closed, water 70 and clear. Extensions have been added to the main ramp to ease boat loading. Striped bass hybrids good on lures and live bait. Walleye good on live bait. Crappie slow. Catfish fair on Danny King bait. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: June 3. Elevation below normal, water 73. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait, stinkbait and worms in the main lake and shallows. Saugeye fair on worms, minnows and crankbaits at 20 ft. in the main lake and along sand bars. Striped bass hybrids fair on crankbaits, live shad, live bait and minnows in the main lake. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County

LawtonkaMay 1. Elevation normal, water 72. White bass fair on minnows and small lures along the spillway and riprap. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on cut bait and stinkbait along the spillway. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County.

Tom Steed: June 3. Elevation 14 ft. below normal, water 72 and murky. Saugeye fair on jigs near rocks and on minnows at 5-10 ft. off points. Blue catfish good on stinkbait and cut bait on the west side. Crappie slow on minnows at 5-10 ft. near rocks. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County.

Waurika: June 2. Elevation below normal, water 65. Striped bass hybrids good on flukes, topwater lures and sassy shad below the dam and around points. Blue and channel catfish good on punch bait, stinkbait and cut bait in the main lake. All other fishing fair. Report submitted by Chris Stover, game warden stationed in Stephens County.
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