Thursday, June 12, 2014

Outdoor News from Michigan 6/12/2014

Purple loosestrife is an invasive plant deemed...
Purple loosestrife is an invasive plant deemed harmful to the watershed. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Here is the weekly fishing report for 6/12/2104

Michigan DNR is encouraging residents to become familiar with the wide variety of snakes the occupy Michigan.  There are a total of 17 species, and according to DNR, 16 of those pose no threat to humans.  In fact snakes play a pivotal role in many important facets of the ecosystem.  To learn  more about the snakes in Michigan, visit HERE.

"Stewarship Volunteers" are playing a helpful role in helping take care of public areas around Michigan, such as helping identify and removing invasive plant species.  These volunteers roles are honored in the story Stewardship volunteers give back to state parks


Saturday, June 7, 2014

Public invited to provide input on new Kirtland’s Warbler Conservation Plan

In 1966, the Kirtland’s warbler was listed as a federally endangered species; today, history is being made as this unique songbird may soon be delisted.

Kirtland's warbler in jack pine treeThe Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service signed a memorandum of understanding in June 2011 to clarify each agency’s commitment to the conservation of the Kirtland’s warbler. Due to the potential for delisting, the three agencies decided it was necessary to develop a Kirtland’s Warbler Conservation Plan (KWCP) that would provide future strategic guidance to sustain a viable population of Kirtland’s warblers across their breeding range.

The current habitat and brown-headed cowbird management programs have been successful in addressing the major threats to Kirtland’s warblers, and the KWCP will help transition management from the recovery phase to the new focus on long-term population sustainability. Kirtland’s warbler breeding habitat in northern Michigan is developed through timber harvest and reforestation, and annual control of cowbirds is required to prevent Kirtland’s warbler nest parasitism. The KWCP will provide goals and technical guidance to managers and others on how to create and maintain breeding habitat and control cowbirds, ensuring long-term survival for the Kirtland’s warbler.

Those who would like to provide input on the plan are invited to either:
  • Email their comments to DNR-Wildlife@michigan.gov before July 28; or
  • Attend a public meeting July 9 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Grayling Nature Center, 100 South James St. in Grayling. A formal presentation about the history of the Kirtland’s warbler will be given starting at 5 p.m., and comments and questions will be received until 7 p.m. 
“We will be revising the KWCP every 10 years to incorporate new information and science,” said DNR endangered species coordinator Dan Kennedy. “We hope all parties who have an interest in Kirtland’s warbler and the new plan will stop by the public meeting or send us a comment via email.”
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Friday, June 6, 2014

Collaborative Science Projects to Benefit Fish, Wildlife and Communities of Upper Midwest and Great Lakes

Fish, wildlife and communities of the upper Midwest and Great Lakes will benefit from leading
Aurora borealis at Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge.
Photo courtesy of Bryan Worth.
edge science projects that aim to inform on-the-ground conservation efforts and natural resource management across the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region.
The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC), a partnership of more than 30 agencies and organizations vested in long-term sustainability of our natural resources and regional communities, announced funding for new and ongoing research projects that aim to connect science with land and water resource managers and policymakers.
“Our partnership is founded on a collaborative approach to problem-solving. Working together across federal, state and non-governmental lines, we are identifying, and filling, key gaps in our collective body of scientific knowledge. By leveraging our resources, we are more equipped to respond to the natural resources challenges of today, and to build and improve upon the decision-support tools future generations will need tomorrow,” said Dave Scott, Assistant Regional Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and LCC Steering Committee co-chair.
The upper Midwest and Great Lakes are home to a diverse range of fish, wildlife and plants supported by the Great Lakes, North America’s largest freshwater resource, coastal wetlands, major rivers, boreal forests and prairie-hardwood ecosystems. Many of these ecosystems surround heavily populated urban centers. Physical and social stressors like climate change, energy development, water demands, invasive species and the demands to support a growing human population are all threatening the ecological integrity of the region.
New research projects receiving 2014 LCC funding include:
Developing a Decision Support System for Prioritization and Restoration of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands – Central Michigan University
By leveraging recently collected coastal wetland monitoring data, a basin-wide coastal wetland prioritization tool will be developed to help wetland managers across the Great Lakes basin prioritize, protect and restore coastal wetlands.
Climate Change Impacts on Wisconsin’s Natural Communities and Conservation Opportunities Areas: Updating Wisconsin’s Wildlife Action Plan - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
State Wildlife Action Plans are important conservation planning tools for state natural resource agencies. Natural resource experts will develop detailed climate change vulnerability assessments for natural communities in Wisconsin, and work to integrate valuable information on climate change impacts and natural communities into the State Wildlife Action Plan.
Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer on Black Ash Forests in the Upper Great Lakes Region - University of Minnesota
The emerald ash borer poses a tremendous threat to ash forest across the upper Great Lakes. This project will increase understanding of the potential regional impacts of emerald ash borer on black ash forest and associated wildlife by leveraging funding and existing research experiments and field trials located across Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
Implementing a Conservation Design with Many Landowners in the Chicago Wilderness Region - Audubon Society
An expansive network of citizen scientists, volunteer land stewards, public land management agencies and non-governmental organizations have pioneered sustainable grassland restoration and management work in the Chicago area, benefiting grassland bird communities on both public and private land. Statistical models of grassland bird distributions and grassland cover will be developed and integrated with Chicago Wilderness’ Green Infrastructure Vision to provide a more holistic and integrated approach to conservation planning and achieving natural resource objectives.
Collaborative Restoration of Aquatic Resources in the South Central Lake Superior Basin -Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
A collaborative geo-database of inventoried connectivity barriers within the South Central Superior Basin will be used to prioritize restoration for approximately 1,800 inventoried stream crossings. This pilot landscape conservation design project will contribute to the LCCs ongoing aquatic connectivity initiative by prioritizing restoration projects within regionalized watersheds. A suite of current remote sensing tools, including light detection and ranging technologies, will be used to target restoration and management needs to meet multiple natural resource objectives.
Ongoing projects receiving 2014 LCC funding include:
  • Developing Fish Trophic Interaction Indicators of Climate Change for the Great Lakes - U.S. Geological Survey – Great Lakes Science Center
  • Regional Risk Assessment for Climate Vulnerable Terrestrial Species - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and University of Wisconsin
  • Optimizing Connectivity in the Great Lakes Basin to Restore Native Fish Migrations While Controlling Invasive Species - University of Wisconsin – Center for Limnology
  • Assessment of Waterfowl Habitat Restoration as an Adaptive Mechanism for Water Sustainability in the Grand Kankakee River Watershed - University of Notre Dame
  • Integrated Models for Estimating Influences of Climate Change on Waterfowl Populations, Waterfowl Habitat, and Hunter Opportunity and Demographics - Ducks Unlimited
For complete information on all new and ongoing research projects supported by the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC, visithttp://greatlakeslcc.org/research-projects/
The grants totaling $755,000 were funded in part by the President’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative; an interagency effort led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. For more information on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service activities related specifically to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, please visithttp://www.fws.gov/GLRI
The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC envisions a conservation community that while governed by their unique purposes and missions, collaborates on sustaining lands and waters that support natural and cultural resources and the services they provide. Our mission is to support and sustain this conservation community by facilitating communication, coordination and collaboration to bridge cutting-edge scientific research with natural resources management. For more information, visit http://www.GreatLakesLCC.org
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Thursday, June 5, 2014

Oklahoma Fishing Report

English: Flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris)

CENTRAL

Arcadia: June 2. Elevation above normal, water murky. Fishing is very sporadic, one day may be good and the next slow. Crappie slow on minnows and tube jigs at 1/2-7 ft. around docks, rocks and shorelines. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and jigs around docks and in the main lake; smaller bass are being caught by people fishing for crappie. Channel and blue catfish slow on cut bait, punch bait and stinkbait around points, coves and shorelines. Report submitted by Vince Mesis, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Draper: June 3. Elevation above normal, water 70. Crappie fair on tube jigs, minnows around brush structure, shorelines and docks. Report submitted by Chad Strang, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

Hefner: June 2. Elevation below normal, water 70-74. Channel and blue catfish good on punch bait, stinkbait and live bait at 2-8 ft. along inlets, points and rocks. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits, buzz baits and jigs at 3-6 ft. along rocks. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. around docks and rocks. White bass, striped bass hybrids and walleye good on minnows, grubs and gay blades at 3-8 ft. around docks, rocks and the inlet. Report submitted by Lucky Lure Tackle.

Overholser: June 3. Elevation normal, water 71. Striped bass hybrids slow on sassy shad in the main lake. Blue and flathead catfish slow on shad in the main lake. Report submitted by Jerrod Davis, game warden stationed in Oklahoma and Canadian counties.

Thunderbird: June 3. Elevation below normal, water 70. Crappie and white bass good on minnows and jigs around docks, shallows and brush structure. Saugeye fair on crankbaits and plastic baits around points and rocks. Channel and blue catfish fair on cut bait in channels and around rocks. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits, topwater lures and spinnerbaits along flats, weed beds and standing timber. Report submitted by Chad Strang, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

Wes Watkins: June 3. Elevation below normal. White bass fair on crankbaits and topwater lures in the main lake. Channel and blue catfish good on stinkbait and worms along shallows. Report submitted by Mike France, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County.

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 78. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around rocks and docks. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, worms, stinkbait and hotdogs around docks, shorelines, shallows and the west end of the lake. Largemouth bass good on small lures, spinnerbaits, plastic baits and sassy shad along weed beds and standing timber. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Chandler: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 78. Crappie good on minnows and hair jigs around docks and shorelines. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits and crankbaits at 6-8 ft. along weed beds and the main lake. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, stinkbait and minnows along shallows and the dam. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County. 

Copan: June 1. Elevation normal, water 73. Crappie slow on minnows and tube jigs at 2-5 ft. along shorelines, creek channels and brush structure. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Ft. Gibson: May 31. Elevation above normal, water 75. Crappie good on minnows, jigs, small lures and small shad colored crankbaits at 6 ft. around brush structure and shallows. White bass slow on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and grubs at 6 ft. around points, shallows, trolling and the main lake. Blue, channel and flathead catfish excellent on live shad, shrimp and worms at 5-15 ft. in the main lake, along flats and shallows. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and plastic baits at 3-5 ft. along weed beds, shallows and coves. Report submitted by Rick Stafford in Wagoner, Okla.

Grand: June 2. Elevation normal. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish good on fresh cut bait shallow. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa.

Greenleaf: June 3. Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 72 and clear. Largemouth bass good on chartreuse/white spinnerbaits, crankbaits, worms and jigs in creek channels, around brush structure and rocky points. Catfish good on fresh cut bait and stinkbait on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush structure mid-lake around islands. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hudson: June 3. Elevation above normal, water 72. Paddlefish slow below the dam. Largemouth bass good on buzz baits, topwater lures, spinnerbaits and plastic baits at 4-12 ft. around brush structure. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. in coves and around standing timber. Channel catfish slow on shad and shrimp at 8-20 ft. below the dam, tail water and points. Blue catfish good on cut bait and shad at 7-18 ft. below the dam and in the river channel. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes counties.

Hulah: June 1. Elevation normal, water 73. Crappie fair on minnows, hair jigs and tube jigs at 3-6 ft. around brush structure, coves and the main lake. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on cut bait, worms and chicken liver in the main lake and along shorelines. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Kaw: June 2. Elevation rising, water 72. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait and worms at 2-5 ft. along flats, shorelines and rocks staged in shallows to spawn and floating shrimp at 1-2 ft. around rocks. White bass and striped bass hybrids excellent on crankbaits, spoons, slabs and live shad at 5-15 ft. in the main lake, around points and riprap and trolling under bridges and main lake humps. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 3-12 ft. around brush structure and riprap. Walleye fair on crankbaits and live bait at 3-10 ft. below the dam, in shallows and around points. Some nice sized walleye are being caught on cloudy days using shallow running crankbaits on rocky points, and on live bait below the dam. Flathead catfish good on goldfish, sunfish and crawfish at 4-10 ft. along rocks. Flathead are gorging themselves in preparation for the spawn. Fish are being caught near the rocks all around the lake on rod-and-reel and on trotlines. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Kay County.

Keystone: June 3. Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 72. Catfish good on cut bait. Crappie fair on minnows. Report submitted by Karlin Bailey, game warden stationed in Creek County

Lower Illinois: June 2. Releasing one unit almost constantly except on weekends. Trout good on orange Power Bait and Rapalas. Fly fishing good in eddies and still water stripping wooly buggars. Report submitted by Jeremy Bersche, game warden stationed in Sequoyah County.

Oologah: Elevation normal, water 73. Blue and channel catfish good on shad at 5-10 ft. below the dam and around rocks. White bass fair on crankbaits at 10-15 ft. along flats. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at 3-6 ft. around rocks. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. around brush structure. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County.

Skiatook: June 1. Elevation below normal, water mid 70s and clear. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on live shad at 15-20 ft. in the main lake. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits at 5-10 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 5-15 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Webbers Falls: June 3. Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 76 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and bill baits along creek channels, rocky points and brush structure. Catfish good on fresh cut bait on bottom along mudflats and drifting. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in green and purple around structure. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

NORTHWEST

Canton: May 31. Elevation below normal, water 72. Crappie and white bass fair on minnows and jigs at 1-5 ft. along riprap. Channel catfish good on crickets and minnows at 2-8 ft. along riprap. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County.

Ft. Supply: June 2. Elevation normal. White bass fair on minnows and trolling all over the lake. Channel catfish good on cut bait and stinkbait at 15-20 ft. off the shorelines. Crappie fair on chartreuse jigs at the dam and jetties. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Woodward County.

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: May 31. Elevation below normal, water 74 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on spinnerbaits, topwater lures, jerk baits and swim baits at 4-12 ft. using long cast along flats, points and brush structure. Crappie and sunfish fair on minnows and white/chartreuse and white/blue jigs around brush structure. White bass good on jigs, spoons, lipless baits and topwater lures from surface to 10 ft. along flats and points and fair on topwater lures in open water chasing shad. Report submitted by Jack Melton. 

Blue River: June 3. Elevation normal, water 78 and murky. Smallmouth and spotted bass good on in-line spinnerbaits, tube jigs and grubs at 4-5 ft. around rocks, creek channels and below waterfalls. Channel catfish fair on minnows, chicken liver and stinkbait at 6-8 ft. in the river channel and around brush structure. Sunfish and bluegill good on grasshoppers, crickets, in-line spinnerbaits and grubs at 1-3 ft. in shallows. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: May 30. Elevation normal, water 72. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on flukes, crankbaits and plastic baits at 10-15 ft. around brush structure, standing timber and rocks. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, worms and stinkbait at 10-15 ft. in channels and mouth of the river. Crappie good on grubs, minnows and jigs at 15-20 ft. around standing timber and brush structure. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.
                          
Eufaula: June 1. Elevation normal, water 83 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits around points and rocky areas. White bass good on slab spoons at 20-30 ft. around standing rock and Duchess Creek area. Blue catfish good on a variety of baits in rocky spawning areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. around boat docks and standing timber. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County. 

Hugo: June 1. Elevation 1 ft. above normal. Tail water release have slowed. Catfish fair on cut bait below the dam and good on juglines and trotlines baited with cut bait and live sunfish in the main lake. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastics around brush. Crappie fair to good at 12-15 ft. around structure and trees in the main lake. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: June 3. Elevation normal, water 74. Largemouth bass excellent on plastic baits, topwater lures and in-line spinnerbaits at 2-6 ft. along rocks, shallows and weed beds. Channel and blue catfish good on chicken liver, shad, punch bait and worms around rocks, creek channels and the discharge. White bass and striped bass hybrids good on jigs, lipless baits, shad and slabs along creek channels, rocks and points. Report submitted by Tyler Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

Lower Mountain Fork: June 1. Elevation normal, water 58. Trout excellent on nymphs, midges and caddis flies along the spillway and rocks. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

McGee Creek: June 1. Elevation above normal, water 73. Flathead catfish good on sunfish at 6-14 ft. in coves. Channel catfish fair on cut bait at 10-20 ft. along riprap. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, plastic baits and spinnerbaits at 2-10 ft. along weed beds, standing timber and rocks. Crappie fair on minnows at 6-12 ft. around brush structure. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Murray: June 3. Elevation below normal, water 72. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on crankbaits, plastic baits and sassy shad at 3-7 ft. in coves, weed beds and rocks. Channel catfish good on worms, stinkbait and shrimp at 2-5 ft. along rocks and riprap. Crappie fair on minnows, jigs and small lures at 5-12 ft. around brush structure, rocks and docks. Sunfish and bluegill good on jigs, small lures, minnows and worms at 2-5 ft. in shallows, weed beds and docks. Sunfish species are still in spawning patterns, so look for beds in shallower water. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.

Pine Creek: June 1. Elevation above normal, water 65. Largemouth, spotted and white bass on Alabama rigs, worms and spinnerbaits at 8-12 ft. around points and creek channels. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-16 ft. around brush structure and shallows. Flathead catfish good on sunfish in creek channels. Channel catfish good on chicken liver around standing timber. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: June 2. Striped and white bass fair up the Canadian river with most catches being made when there is discharge from Eufaula dam. Bass good on flukes along weed beds and on diving baits around points. Crappie fair on trotlines and juglines baited with cut bait or live sunfish near river or creek channels. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Haskell County. 

Sardis: May 31. Elevation slightly above normal, water 75 and clear to murky. Largemouth and spotted bass good on Carolina-rigged spinnerbaits and swim baits at 6-14 ft. Channel and blue catfish good on cut bait and dead minnows. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at 6-14 ft. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 66. Largemouth and smallmouth bass excellent on crankbaits, jigs and plastic baits at 5-15 ft. in coves, creek channels and riprap. Channel and blue catfish excellent on worms, live bait, minnows and shrimp at 10-15 ft. along creek channels, riprap, shorelines and cleaning stations. Crappie and sunfish good on tub jigs, minnows and plastic baits at 5-15 ft. along shorelines, riprap and coves. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: June 1. Elevation above normal, water 70. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on bill baits, plastic baits and spinnerbaits at 3-6 ft. along brush structure, shorelines and creek channels. Crappie, bluegill and sunfish good on minnows and jigs at 4-9 ft. along creek channels and brush structure. Flathead catfish good on goldfish, sunfish and live bait at 10-12 ft. in the main lake, river mouth and channels. Channel and blue catfish good on chicken liver, cut bait and hotdogs at 10-12 ft. in creek channels and the main lake. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

SOUTHWEST

Ellsworth: June 1. Elevation below normal, water 73. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait and stinkbait. White bass fair on minnows, spinnerbaits and small lures along creek channels and rocks. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County.

Foss: May 29. Elevation 16 ft. below normal with gates closed, water 70 and clear. Extensions have been added to the main ramp to ease boat loading. Striped bass hybrids good on lures and live bait. Walleye good on live bait. Crappie slow. Catfish fair on Danny King bait. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: June 3. Elevation below normal, water 73. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait, stinkbait and worms in the main lake and shallows. Saugeye fair on worms, minnows and crankbaits at 20 ft. in the main lake and along sand bars. Striped bass hybrids fair on crankbaits, live shad, live bait and minnows in the main lake. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County

LawtonkaMay 1. Elevation normal, water 72. White bass fair on minnows and small lures along the spillway and riprap. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on cut bait and stinkbait along the spillway. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County.

Tom Steed: June 3. Elevation 14 ft. below normal, water 72 and murky. Saugeye fair on jigs near rocks and on minnows at 5-10 ft. off points. Blue catfish good on stinkbait and cut bait on the west side. Crappie slow on minnows at 5-10 ft. near rocks. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County.

Waurika: June 2. Elevation below normal, water 65. Striped bass hybrids good on flukes, topwater lures and sassy shad below the dam and around points. Blue and channel catfish good on punch bait, stinkbait and cut bait in the main lake. All other fishing fair. Report submitted by Chris Stover, game warden stationed in Stephens County.
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Michigan Fishing Report


Click on the links below to jump to the report section that interests you most:
Southeast Lower Peninsula
Southwest Lower Peninsula
Northeast Lower Peninsula
Northwest Lower Peninsula
Upper Peninsula



It’s here! Michigan’s annual Summer Free Fishing Weekend will be observed this Saturday, June 7 and Sunday, June 8. Both residents and non-residents can fish without a license however all regulations still apply. This is a great opportunity to introduce someone new to the sport of fishing so don’t miss out, call a family member, friend or neighbor and take them fishing!
SOUTHEAST LOWER PENINSULA
Lake Erie:  Walleye were caught southwest of Stony Point in 18 to 24 feet and near the River Raisin buoys in 16 to 22 feet. Fish were also caught in 18 to 22 feet out near the C-Buoy and the stacks as well as straight out from the campground at Sterling State Park. Anglers are trolling spoons or purple and pink crawler harnesses early or hard jerk baits mid-day. Fewer bass were caught at Bolles Harbor however anglers did catch some big largemouth. 

Detroit River:  The white bass run is on and fishing has been very good along the entire river. Walleye are still in the river and some anglers are having decent luck pulling wire after dark. Muskie season opens on Saturday.

Portage Chain-of-Lakes:  Anglers are doing well catching bluegill and bass. The bluegills are on their beds in the shallow sandy shorelines and sunken islands throughout the lake system. Bass are being caught in the weedy flats and along the drop-offs. Carp are starting to show up in good numbers in the shallows and along the rivers so this is a great time for bow fishing.

Lake St. Clair:  Has good walleye fishing near Metro Beach. White bass fishing has been very good near Huron Point and at the mouth of the Clinton River. Good smallmouth action in Anchor Bay and off the Mile Roads. Muskie season opens on Saturday.

St. Clair River:  Continues to have very good walleye fishing. Anglers are bottom bouncing, jigging and whipping.

Lexington:   Is producing lake trout and steelhead in waters up to 80 feet deep. Boats are targeting 40 feet in the early morning and moving deeper as the sun comes up. Pier anglers are catching rock bass and the occasional pike. 

Port Sanilac:  Is also producing some large lake trout and steelhead. Most are fishing within 40 to 80 feet. Lake trout are just off the bottom but steelhead are higher in the water column as they are surface feeding for insects. Pier anglers caught rock bass and pike. 

Harbor Beach:  Boats trolling in 40 to 80 feet are getting large lake trout near the bottom and steelhead off high lines. The steelhead are eating June bugs and other insects off the surface. Start in 40 feet early in the morning and move deeper as the sun comes up. Those fishing off the breakwall at night caught walleye.

Port Austin:  Walleye have been caught off the breakwall at night.  

Saginaw Bay:  Had excellent walleye fishing and limit catches were the rule. Anglers did very well off Pinconning, Linwood, the Bay City State Park, off the mouth of the Kawkawlin River, north and east of Spoils Island, the Callahan Reef off Finn Road, around both Spark Plugs and in the Slot between Quanicassee and North Island. Depths range from five to 30 feet deep. As a rule of thumb, the shallows are best in the early morning and deeper water later in the day. Crawler harnesses were the go-to bait, with spinner colors of purple, white, gold, silver, or chartreuse. Those trolling deeper caught walleye on spoons or crank baits. Hot colors for crank baits were yellow perch and a goby pattern. 

Tittabawassee River:  Is still producing decent catches of walleye near Mapleton. A few bass and pike were also caught.   


SOUTHWEST LOWER PENINSULABluegills were on the beds. Male bass are still guarding the beds because females are vacating the shallow waters. 

St. Joseph:  
Salmon are being caught on spoons in 80 to 100 feet however fishing was still spotty. Pier fishing was slow except for a couple freshwater drum taken on spoons. Perch fishing is slow with only a few fish taken in waters 50 feet or deeper.  

South Haven:  
Salmon fishing is slow with only a couple chinook or lake trout taken in 60 feet. Pier and perch fishing remain slow.  

Grand Haven:  
Has good salmon fishing. Chinook were caught in 80 to 140 feet and steelhead out deeper. Anglers are running spoons, spin/fly combos and meat rigs 20 to 80 feet down. Hot colors were orange, blue, green or mixed veggie. Pier anglers can catch plenty of alewife for bait but the only fish biting were freshwater drum.   

Grand River in Grand Rapids:  
Has been good for both channel and flathead catfish. Try cut bait, live sucker minnows, crawlers or leeches on the bottom. Bluegills have been caught on leaf worms and wax worms. Smallmouth bass are hitting on tube baits, crank baits and live bait. A few walleye were taken on crank baits, crawlers and leeches. Millennium Park was good for panfish and bass.  

Grand River at Lansing:  
Has good smallmouth action. Try tube baits, leeches, crawlers or minnows. Anglers are catching lots of rock bass on crawlers, red worms or beetle spinners.

Muskrat Lake:  
Is producing some crappie. Try spec minnows, wax worms or small twister grubs.

Morrison Lake:  
Anglers are catching bluegill and largemouth bass. Crappie are hitting on wax worms, spec minnows or small twister grubs.     

Reeds Lake:  
Is producing panfish and pike.      

Muskegon:  
Has good fishing especially north of the port in 130 to 150 feet.  Steelhead and smaller Chinook were in the top 40 feet while the bigger salmon were between 80 feet and the bottom. Use spoons up high and paddles or meat rigs down low. Try orange, U.V and mix veggie for spoons, white paddles with green flies or purple meat rigs.     

Muskegon River: 
 Water levels are good and water temperatures are warming. Fly hatches are underway so those fly fishing are doing well. 

Whitehall:  
Pier anglers fishing the channel caught a few walleye and panfish. Boat anglers caught mainly steelhead in 50 to 60 feet with bright colored lures. Orange was the hot color.


NORTHEAST LOWER PENINSULA
Rogers City:  
Lake trout are everywhere. Fish have been caught on dodgers or cowbells with spin glows in the bottom 10 feet of waters 35 to 60 feet deep. Those fishing higher in the water column caught the occasional Atlantic, Chinook or pink salmon and steelhead. Spoons also caught fish. Good colors were green, blue and orange with silver on them. Use glow spoons early or late and dark colors on cloudy days. Those trolling body baits in the shallows had limited success. Look for Atlantic salmon off the marinas and breakwalls.       

Alpena:   
Is producing a good number of lake trout and a few salmon around Thunder Bay Island and the Nine Mile Can. Try the top half of waters 40 to 90 feet deep with the same lures and colors they are using at Rogers City. Walleye fishing was slow but should pick up soon. Try early morning or late evening with crawler harnesses or body baits.   

Thunder Bay River:  
The steelhead action continues to slow as warm weather will push them back out into Lake Huron. Anglers may find a few Atlantic salmon feeding on steelhead eggs. Try drifting or floating artificial beads and flies on the bottom. Anglers are catching plenty of smallmouth bass and panfish. Once the minnows move back into the river the walleye should follow.   

Harrisville:  
Had good fishing.  Lake trout were 80 to 100 feet but steelhead and salmon were 50 to 70 feet. Spoons, body baits, fly’s and cut bait all caught fish. Downriggers, dipseys, lead core, copper line and planer boards were all producing. Walleye were caught around the harbor walls and north towards Sturgeon Point. Try crawler harnesses or body baits.  

Oscoda:  
Boats that have made it out on the big lake had good success for lake trout steelhead and the occasional salmon. Lake trout are in 100 feet but steelhead are closer to 60 and 80 feet. Spoons and body baits off down riggers, lead core, copper line and planer boards are all working well.   

Au Sable River:  
Steelhead continue to run up the river and can be found on the beds. The Boy Scout Camp and High Banks had the most activity. Spawn, fly's and small spinners are producing the most fish. Pier anglers caught a mix of steelhead, Atlantic and walleye throughout the day and evening.  

Houghton Lake: 
 Is producing walleye and crappie for those using minnows or leeches. Not much on bluegill yet but anglers are catching some bass.

Lake St. Helen:  
Bluegill are finally starting to show signs up spawning. Crappie are out of the canals and are being caught in the lakes. A few walleye were caught. A good number of pike were caught on spinners and spoons.       

Tawas:  
Pier fishing has slowed as we move into summer. Not much is happening on the inside but walleye, smallmouth bass and channel catfish have been caught at night on the outside of the wall. Those trolling from the tip of Tawas Point and Buoy #2 caught a few walleye in 15 to 30 feet.  

Au Gres: 
 Had most of the walleye action with a lot of boats fishing between Point Lookout and Pointe Au Gres but some were running eight to 10 miles south of Pointe Au Gres and fishing in 10 to 25 feet off the mouth of the Pine River. 

Au Gres River:  
Catfish anglers are doing well in the lower river.  


NORTHWEST LOWER PENINSULA
Bluegills are starting to show up and make beds in the shallows. It should be good fishing going into this weekend.  

Harbor Springs:  
Lake trout were caught in 80 to 120 feet off the point. Smallmouth bass are moving into the shallows near the State Park.  

Petoskey:  
A couple boats were lake trout fishing near Bay Harbor. Pier anglers on the D Pier caught smallmouth bass and carp. Bass are hitting on crank baits. Those fishing off the beach near the breakwall caught smallmouth bass in the morning.  

Charlevoix:  
For lake trout, try 40 to 50 feet around North Point. A couple boats were trolling for walleye at night in the channel, Round Lake and into Lake Michigan. Try crank baits on the bottom. Smallmouth bass are starting to show up in the channel and a few were caught on soft scented rubber baits.   

Lake Charlevoix:  
Was producing walleye in the Narrows near Ironton and pike near the point in Loeb Bay.  

Bear River:  
Was a bit low with the lack of rain. Anglers are still picking up the occasional steelhead near the dam however most of the fish are now upstream and spawning or have gone back out to Lake Michigan. Suckers are in the river and have been caught up near the dam.  

Traverse City:  
The East Bay is producing lake trout for those jigging in 90 feet. Cisco were caught by those jigging in 60 to 70 feet and smallmouth bass were taken in 5 to 30 feet. In the West Bay, anglers caught lake trout in 90 feet. Smallmouth bass fishing should be good in the shallows or along the drop-offs.  

Elk River:  
Steelhead remain in the river. Smallmouth bass fishing was fair. Try worms, leeches or artificial baits.  

Boardman River:  
Continues to produce a couple steelhead even though the spring run is just about done. Smallmouth bass are hitting on live or artificial baits near the Union Street Dam and the mouth.

Platte Bay:  
Is producing some brown trout off the mouth of the river. Black and chrome rapalas were the ticket. A few walleye were also caught. Lake trout are still out a mile to the west or the north and hitting on brown or copper spoons.  

Platte River:  
Fishing has slowed however trout were caught between the hatchery and Goose Road Campground by those using Blue wing Olives and Hendrickson’s. Carp and suckers are in the river between the hatchery and the big lake. Smallmouth bass can be found between the M-22 Bridge and Loon Lake. 

Frankfort:  
Chinook salmon have arrived. Those trolling the Herring Hole caught fish 70 to 90 feet down in 160 to 200 feet of water. Most are using smaller copper colored spoons or meat rigs. Brown trout are still hitting between the piers. Try black and silver or black and gold body baits.   

Onekama:  
Had no activity as anglers were heading to Manistee or Ludington.  

Portage Lake:  
Bluegill and largemouth bass are on the beds in the shallows. Perch are hitting on wigglers near the mouth of the channel in the morning but anglers will have to sort through the small ones.   

Lakes Cadillac and Mitchell:  T
he bluegills and bass were finally on the beds. Anglers have done well when floating live bait or casting lures.  

Manistee:  
Boats have been catching salmon and trout in 60 to 160 feet. Most are using orange, green or yellow spoons in the top 70 feet. Pier anglers are catching a few brown trout on spoons and live bait.

Ludington:  
Chinook salmon and steelhead have been caught in the top 60 feet of waters 80 to 180 feet deep. Orange and green spoons work best.  

Pentwater:  
Had few anglers but those able to get out should find some trout and salmon in 40 to 60 feet. Fishing across from the Silver Lake Sand Dunes is usually a safe be. Target the top portion of the water column or about 30 to 50 feet down with bright colored lures. 


UPPER PENINSULA
Ontonagon:  
The ice is just about gone. With all the rain, anglers will need to use caution in the river and watch for debris coming down. Fishing has been good. Anglers have taken a mix of lake trout, brown trout, Chinook, coho and steelhead when trolling in waters between six and 35 feet deep. Many are using lead core and stick baits but fish were also on planer boards with spoons or body baits.  

Keweenaw Bay:  
Still had ice but it is thinning out. Boat anglers were able to launch at the L’Anse Marina and start trolling however watch the north wind which could blow ice back into the bay. Those trolling in 30 to 60 feet caught Chinook, coho, steelhead, brown trout and splake on spoons and body baits in a variety of colors. Most of the splake were caught in shallow water four to 15 feet off the rock dock near the L’Anse Marina and off the mouth of Linden Creek. Try spinners, cleo’s or crawlers. Lake trout action was a little better off Big Louie’s Point and Gay Point. Spoons worked best in 130 to 180 feet.  

Lake Antoine:  
Boat anglers are getting some bigger crappie, bluegill and perch when drifting or still-fishing crawlers and wax worms. They also caught a good number of smallmouth bass and pike when casting or trolling crank baits. Lake Antoine Road is still under construction with only one lane open.  

Marquette:  
Most of the ice has blown out of bay leaving a few lingering ice masses.  Boat anglers should be able to troll some areas from the harbor to the Carp River and the Chocolay River with little trouble. Some caught steelhead with a mix of coho and Chinook. Water temperatures are still extremely cold at 40 degrees. Shore anglers at the mouth of the Carp River did catch small splake, a few coho and steelhead on spawn or small spoons.

Little Bay De Noc:  
Walleye anglers reported catches throughout the bay with the Ford River area being best for those trolling or drifting crawlers in eight to 16 feet from Breezy Point south to Round Island. Catch rates were fair from the First and Third Reefs in 10 to 20 feet.  Walleye are leaving the Whitefish River. There are good numbers of smaller fish. Good bass fishing near the Ford River. Shore and boat anglers are using plastics, spinners, crank baits and crawlers along the shoreline and around the mouth in four to eight feet. Perch anglers reported several good catches when using crawlers in eight to 14 feet in the Escanaba Yacht Harbor.  

Escanaba River:  
Had fair walleye catches on crawler harnesses in eight to 12 feet.   

Big Bay De Noc:  
The walleye action near Ogontz has slowed but a few fish were still caught on crawler harnesses in 10 to 14 feet. The head of the bay up by Valentine Creek was best in eight to 10 feet. Smallmouth bass are still very active and nesting. Good catches reported throughout the bay with Ogontz and the Fish Dam Rivers area being fished the most. Anglers are casting or trolling crank baits, plastics or crawlers in four to eight feet. Those bow fishing are targeting carp near Ogontz. Higher water levels have made it a bit more difficult but several fish were still taken. Fairport had no salmon reports as water temperatures are too cold.   

Au Train:  
Had light fishing activity in the bay and only a few shore anglers at the Rock River and the Au Train River. Most of the ice has left but there are still a few lingering ice flows. A few coho were seen near shore during a fly hatch. Boat anglers had poor results for Chinook and coho.  

Munising:  
Still had some ice flows hanging around but inside the bay was open. Boat anglers have done well taking a mix of Chinook, coho, splake and steelhead.  Pier anglers had fair results for splake, menominee and steelhead when casting or when using spawn and worms. Those able to hook splake reported 15 to 18 inch fish. Shore anglers had poor results.  

Grand Marais:  
The ice has diminished quite a bit but still caused a few issues on certain days. Boat anglers caught mainly coho along with the occasional Chinook or steelhead. Most of the steelhead head caught are spawned out and turning dark.  Pier anglers reported fair to very good catches of whitefish, coho, and menominee. Fish in the two and three pound range were caught. Very few steelhead were taken. No report from shore anglers as activity at the mouth of the Sucker River has quit.   

St. Mary’s River:  
Is producing some yellow perch ranging eight to 11 inches. Anglers are launching out of Sherman Park and perch fishing in 25 to 30 feet of water along the shipping channel near the first red buoy. Most are using shiners. Good walleye fishing at the mouth of the Gogomain River. Crawler harnesses, and rubber tail body baits are working good. Again there were no weeds in any of the bays so this is a good time to fish. Walleye were slow in and around Lime Island and Raber Bay.

Detour:  
Anglers continue to catch trout and salmon around the lighthouse.  

Drummond Island:  
Had excellent walleye fishing in Scott Bay. Anglers are trolling blue and chrome crank baits or crawler harnesses in four to eight feet. Planer boards seem to work best however bottom bouncers used with crawler harnesses are also working well. There are no weeds to fish around at this time so anglers are enjoying their time on the water.  Smallmouth were caught in Maxton Bay.

Cedarville and Hessel:  
Perch are in the Hessel Marina. Some perch were up near 11 inches however there is still a lot of undersized fish to keep it fun. Pike fishing has picked up in Government Bay, Musky Bay, Middle Entrance, and off the pier at Hessel. Bass are around, but you will have to work to find them.  

Carp River:  
Anglers are still trying for steelhead and suckers at the Carp River Bridge and McDonald Rapids.  
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HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS FROM ACROSS OKLAHOMA PARTICIPATED IN THE 2014 OKLAHOMA SCHOLASTIC SHOOTING SPORTS PROGRAM STATE SHOOT.

1st Place Senior Team, Altus
More than 40 schools were represented at the Oklahoma Trapshooters Association in El Reno on May 7 for the State Shoot. The event brought students together after a season of practice and competition at their respective schools as part of the Oklahoma Scholastic Shooting Sports Program (OKSSSP), administered by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.
Damon Springer congratulates the top three males in the senior division.

OKSSSP is part of the Wildlife Department's in-school education programs. The program is a trap-based shotgun program that - much like the National Archery in the Schools Program - is designed to instill confidence and self-esteem while teaching students the proper and safe handling of firearms.

 "The OKSSSP has proven to be immensely popular among the state schools that have joined the program. Not only are students given the chance to learn about firearms and gun safety, but the schools receive financial support from endowment funds that they receive for participating in the program. The endowment funds are made possible because of the generous support of Larry and Brenda Potterfield and the MidwayUSA Foundation's Team Endowment Account Program", said Damon Springer, senior information and education specialist and coordinator of the Oklahoma Scholastic Shooting Sports Program.

The OKSSSP was launched in August of 2013 with 20 pilot schools and has grown to include 50 schools. It was a great turn-out for the 2014 OKSSSP State Shoot with 659 students in grades 7-12, shooting more than 16,000 rounds. In the Junior Division, Locust Grove took first followed by Verden and then Howe teams. In the Senior Division, Altus won the competition. Trailing behind were Stilwell, Depew, Sequoyah and Keys senior teams.

Every high school team that participated received $2,500 in endowment funds. First through 5th place high schools teams received additional endowment funds (1st- $5,000, 2nd-$4,000, 3rd-$3,000, 4th-$2,000, 5th-$1,000). Individual and team awards were also given out to the top teams and individual shooters. Each team with endowments through MidwayUSA Foundation are able to draw up to 5% each year to use for team expenses, such as ammunition, range fees, travel, uniforms and more.

"It was a pretty windy day even for Oklahoma with winds gusting from the south at 20-35 miles an hour throughout the entire day. However, even under these adverse conditions there were three high school boys that shot perfect scores by breaking all 25 targets. Zane Scrivner from Sequoyah, Zach Pyle from Altus and Terry Linn from Howe all ended up in shoot off for 1st-3rd place. Zane ended up in first, Zach took 2nd and Terry ended up in 3rd, added Springer."

Because of the support from the MidwayUSA Foundation, and the financial backing from Larry and Brenda Potterfield, OKSSSP will continue to grow. Larry Potterfield said, "Brenda and I are so blessed to be able to give financial support to youth shooting sports throughout the country and are happy to contribute to the success of Oklahoma's Scholastic Shooting Sports Program. Youth are the future of shooting sports, and we are so glad to have a part in helping to sustain youth shooting programs in Oklahoma."

To see the full team and individual results log onto http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/education/step.htm
  
Teachers interested in learning more about the OKSSSP program or in starting the program at their school should contact Springer at (405) 317-6316 ordamon.springer@odwc.ok.gov.
1st Place Junior Division Team, Locust Grove.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

IOWA: LEARN FISHING TIPS FROM THE EXPERTS

English: Iowa Department of Natural Resources logo

Whether you want to learn to fish, compete for prizes at a tournament, or just have some fun, there is something for everyone at upcoming fishing clinics held across the state. 
A list of fishing clinics is available on the Iowa Department of Natural Resources website under the special events calendar athttps://programs.iowadnr.gov/specialevents/Search.aspx.  For more information about individual events, call the number listed with the clinic. 
Activities vary at each clinic and may include fish identification, how to operate a reel, different ways to cast, knot tying, how to handle fish, bait presentations and different fish cleaning methods. 

UPCOMING FISHING CLINICS
June 7
Anita, Lake Anita Kids Fishing Day, Lake Anita, 10 a.m. to Noon
Ankeny, Ankeny Optimist Club Fishing Derby, Hawkeye Park Pond, 10 a.m. to Noon
Bloomfield, Youth Fishing Clinic, Davis County Pond 7 (S-NM1), 9:30 a.m. to Noon
Center Junction, Central Park Annual Kids Fishing Derby, Central Park Lake, 8 a.m. to Noon
Central City, Annual Kids Fishing Clinic, Wapsi – Central City to Oxford Junction, 9-11:30 a.m
Correctionville, NwIowaOutdoors.com Youth Fishing Tournament, Little Sioux Lake, 8 a.m. to Noon
Davenport, West Lake Park Fishing Clinic, Lake of the Hills, 8 a.m. to Noon
Des Moines, Pleasant Hill Youth Fishing Derby, Copper Creek, 8 a.m. to Noon
Duncombe, Youth Fishing Derby, Brushy Creek Lake, 10 a.m. to Noon
Dundee, Backbone Lake Kids Fishing Clinic and Derby, Backbone Lake, 1-3:30 p.m.
Lenox, Seth Thompson Memorial Kids Fishing Day, Wilson Park Lake, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Maquoketa, Free Fishing Clinic, Hurstville Pond, 9-11 a.m.
Marion, Kids Fish Iowa! Adventure, Lowe Park, 3-6 p.m.
Nevada, Go FISH – “Fishing Instruction Starts Here,” Hickory Grove Lake, 8-11 a.m.
Newton, Hook, Line and Sinker Fishing Derby, Mariposa Lake, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
North Liberty, Free Family Fishing Event, Liberty Centre Pond, 10 a.m. to Noon
Onawa, Blue Lake Kids Day, Blue Lake, 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Scranton, Scranton’s Kids Fishing Days, Lost Lagoon, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Shenandoah, Optimist Club/Page County Conservation Fishing Derby, Pioneer Park, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Sperry, DMCC Kids Fishing Derby, Big Hollow Lake, 9 a.m. to Noon
Stacyville, Family Fishing Day!, Riverside Park, 9 a.m. to Noon
Ventura, Fishing Clinic, Clear Lake, 8:30-10 a.m.
West Des Moines, 15th Annual Cops N’ Bobbers Fishing Clinic, West Des Moines City Hall, 9 a.m. to Noon
Woodbine, Kid’s Fishing Day, Willow Lake, 9-11 a.m.

June 8
Adel, Family Fishing Fun, Glissman Pond, 4-6 p.m.
Bellevue, Kids Fishing Day, Mississippi River Pool 13, 2-4 p.m.
West Point, Fishing Clinic and Derby, Pollmiller Park Lake, 9 a.m. to Noon

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Wisconsin: Join us June 7-8 for free outdoor fun: state parks entry, fishing, trails, ATV riding

Wisconsin's great outdoors is always the ticket to fun with family and friends. On June 7 and 8 it gets even better -- it's free for Wisconsin residents and visitors! 
  • Free entry to state parks and forests
  •  Free fishing
  • Free DNR trails
  • Free ATV/UTV riding on public trails open to such uses
Free fun weekend video