Thursday, July 21, 2016

The trumpeter swan: July’s Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial featured bird

“To form a perfect conception of the beauty and elegance of these Swans, you must observe them when they are not aware of your proximity, and as they glide over the waters of some secluded inland pond. On such occasions, the neck, which at other times is held stiffly upright, moves in graceful curves, now bent forward, now inclined backwards over the body. Now with an extended scooping movement the head becomes immersed for a moment, and with a sudden effort a flood of water is thrown over the back and wings, when it is seen rolling off in sparkling globules, like so many large pearls. The bird then shakes its wings, beats the water, and as if giddy with delight shoots away, gliding over and beneath the surface of the liquid element with surprising agility and grace. Imagine, reader, that a flock of fifty Swans are thus sporting before you, as they have more than once been in my sight, and you will feel, as I have felt, more happy and void of care than I can describe.”
More than 150 years ago, John James Audubon wrote this about the awe inspired by watching trumpeter swans as they go about their business, untroubled by the doings of humans. Thanks to the determined efforts of conservationists across North America, these impressive birds will continue to mesmerize future generations.

Early settlers and explorers in Michigan noted that trumpeter swans were found here in abundance. Starting in the late 1800s, however, an increase in European settlement brought with it the conversion of wetlands to farmlands. It also brought market hunters, who harvested swans to sell their meat to restaurants, fluffy down for pillows, feather quills for pens, and skins and feathers for the fashion and hat trade. Unlike today’s hunters, who provide conservation funding through their hunting license and equipment purchases and only take as many animals as can be replaced through reproduction, market hunters had few regulations and little care for ensuring the future of the species that they decimated.
Thanks to the passage of federal wildlife protection laws in the early 1900s, this unrestrained harvest was curtailed, but the bird’s habitat still was imperiled. By 1933, only 66 trumpeter swans remained in the United States – mostly in remote areas of the Rocky Mountains and Alaska. The tide began to turn for trumpeter swans in the 1930s, when the Red Rocks Lake National Wildlife Refuge was created to protect the swans around the Rocky Mountains and hunters rallied for additional hunting fees to protect and restore America’s wetlands.

Through careful stewardship, the trumpeter’s numbers slowly increased until wildlife biologists were able to collect limited numbers of swan eggs from the wild to be added to eggs collected from zoos, which were hatched and raised for release into the wild in Michigan. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, these birds were raised until they were 2 years old and then released in high-quality wetlands around the state. Today, over 750 trumpeter swans can be found in Michigan alone and 35,000 swans across the entire United States!
If you venture out to capture the magic that Audubon experienced in the presence of trumpeter swans, be sure to know your quarry. These are the largest waterfowl in the world and can weigh more than 25 pounds. They are 4 feet tall and have a wingspan of over 7 feet – all in all, an intimidating bird. Don’t fear, though, since trumpeter swans are generally shy around people. They even avoid nesting on lakes with a lot of people swimming, boating and fishing. But beware around a swan family – adults are very protective of their young cygnets and may attempt to chase off or attack a person that they think may pose a danger. A canny explorer will know to look for nests atop muskrat lodges on quiet lakes or marshes and will come armed with binoculars and patience.

Today’s conservation challenge for the trumpeter swan is competing with people and the non-native mute swan to find homes to raise the next generation of trumpeters. Lakefront property is highly valued for residential development, and this increased human use may drive off nesting swans. Mute swans, imported from Europe in the 1800s, use the same types of habitats as trumpeter swans and tend to be more aggressive than trumpeters, pushing out our native swan.

When you visit a lake where you see trumpeter swans, respect their privacy and enjoy them from a distance. Try to limit loud and fast recreational activity around trumpeter swans and their nests, and encourage others to do so as well. If you see mute swans on a lake where you live, contact the DNR to find out what can be done to remove this invasive species and help native wildlife. With wise stewardship, we’ll be able to hear the trumpet of the swan for years to come.

The trumpeter swan remains in Michigan year-round; however, is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The year 2016 marks the centennial of the Convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory Birds (also called the Migratory Bird Treaty), signed on Aug. 16, 1916. Three other treaties were signed shortly thereafter with Japan, Russia and Mexico. The Migratory Bird Treaty, the three other treaties signed later, and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act form the cornerstones of efforts to conserve birds that migrate across international borders.

The 2016 Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial celebration will include monthly featured bird stories to our DNR Wildlife Viewing email subscribers, celebration events including a weekend of bird-based programming at state parks and visitor centers, an education program for schools and conservation groups, and more. 

To learn more about the Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial, visit   www.fws.gov/birds/MBTreaty100.  Sign up for DNR Wildlife Viewing emails.

Minnesota school takes action to help pollinators

Service biologist helping an elementary student plant. Photo by USFWS.
In early June, students from Orchard Lake Elementary School in Lakeville, Minnesota learned about the decline of pollinators and decided to do something about it. Collectively, the School’s Impact Academy, which includes more than 150 students in kindergarten through fifth grade, got their hands dirty making a difference for pollinators and learned a lot about these invaluable native pollinating insects in the process!
Private Lands Biologist educating students about pollinators. Photo by USFWS.
Private Lands Biologist educating students about pollinators. Photo by USFWS.
Orchard Lake’s Impact Academy includes a service-learning component, which is a learning strategy that involves community service and connects learning to real world problems. For their spring service learning project, the students decided they wanted to help wildlife on the school property. Their first step was figuring out what group of animals or plants most needed their help right now, and how they could help this group of species on the school’s property.
The Impact Academy students decided to reach out to the Service for help and without hesitation Service biologists contributed their scientific expertise to help the students determine which species could benefit from their help. Jill Utrup, with the Twin Cities Ecological Services Field Office, talked with the students about pollinating insects and how this group of insects that significantly benefits us in our daily lives is really in need of everyone’s help right now. In particular, species such as the rusty-patched bumble bee and monarch butterfly are facing serious population declines. The students were very concerned about the plight of these pollinators and decided that they wanted to plant a garden on the school grounds to help these beneficial insects. After receiving permission from the school’s principal to go forward with planting, they needed to find funding for their project.
The students learned about funding through the Service’s Schoolyard Habitat Program and asked John Riens with the Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program to help. Riens came to the school to talk with the students about what native grass and wildflower species they should consider planting in their pollinator garden. He mentioned considerations such as bloom time, color and pollinators that would be attracted, as well as emphasizing the benefits of using native plants in designing their garden. The students then voted on what species of wildflowers and grasses should be included in the design of the garden.
The abundance of kids and teachers separated into three active teams that cooperatively contributed to planning and outreach for the pollinator garden. The first group was responsible for visiting each classroom to teach students about pollinators and inform them of the changes they would see in front of the school. The second group was in charge of community outreach. Students created flyers and alerted the local press as to what they were doing to help pollinators and how others can help too. Lastly, the third group was in charge of coming up with the design for the garden.
On the day of planting, more than 150 students worked in 30 minute shifts receiving a lesson in planting given by Service staff including representation from the Twin Cities Ecological Services Field Office, Minnesota Private Lands Office and Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. The students, assisted by Service staff, literally “dug in,” digging holes and planting native plants. Prior to planting the native plant “plugs,” all 150+ students gathered to assist with spreading seed and stomping it into the ground! With much excitement over the chance to be outdoors and working on something of their own; students took great pride in their work and their responsibility in implementing the project. At the end of the day, when Service staff was packing up, they observed one of the first monarch butterfly of the year flying over the newly established garden.
“These students truly owned every aspect of this pollinator garden,” says Utrup. “It was very impressive to see the students work together during all phases of this project to accomplish their goal of getting this garden planted and ultimately helping pollinators. The older students that are getting ready to move on to middle school will be able to visit and see how the plants that they planted have changed over the years, and the younger students will get to watch the plants grow along with them during their time at Orchard Lake.”
The teachers have reported that this project has helped their students hone their research skills, critical thinking ability, promoted a sense of comradery, and created confidence in starting and finishing a project that will benefit the community. Teachers and the school principal view this as the “first phase” in the project and plan to use this schoolyard habitat as part of an outdoor classroom. Additionally, the teachers and students hope to incorporate Citizen Science efforts such as Xerces Society’s Bumble Bee Watch or the University of Minnesota’s Monarch Lab’s Monarch Larva Monitoring Project into this project in the near future.
It is hoped that this schoolyard habitat project is the first step in creating a chain reaction in development of these types of projects across the State and beyond. Although this project was not large in size, the educational benefits are huge! Also, every little bit of native habitat helps when it comes to comes to helping pollinating insects. The Service was honored to have helped Orchard Lake Elementary School students in creating a schoolyard habitat project and is committed to supporting Service Director Dan Ashe’s commitment to creating 750 schoolyard habitats across the country. Schoolyard habitat projects can help connect kids with nature using a hands on approach to learning along with potentially inspiring the next generation of conservation–minded citizens.

Oklahoma Weekly Fishing Report 7/21/2016

CENTRAL
 
Arcadia: Elevation normal, water 87 and clearing. Largemouth bass fair on water jigs and swim baits at 6-14 ft. on submerged humps and road beds. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 11-14 ft. on marked brush piles and on rocky points near the overlook. Channel and blue catfish good on shad and cut bait on rocky point near the channel. White bass slow on slabs and live shad at 15-18 ft. on submerged humps. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Draper: July 18. Elevation rising, water 83 and stained. Channel and blue catfish fair on worms, shad and cut bait along channels and riprap. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows around docks and brush structure. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits around weed beds and brush structure. Report submitted by Tell Judkins, game warden stationed in Cleveland County. 
 
Overholser: July 19. Elevation below normal, water murky to muddy. White bass and striped bass hybrids slow on crawdad tails, cut bait and worms around windy points and along the shoreline. Channel and blue catfish fair on live bait and cut bait in the main lake. Buffalo and drum fair on dough bait and worms below the dam. Report submitted by Vince Mesis, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County.

Thunderbird: July 18. Elevation above normal, water 83 and stained. Blue and channel catfish fair on worms, shad and cut bait along coves and riprap. Largemouth bass fair on bill baits and spinnerbaits around brush structure and weed beds. Saugeye fair on crankbaits and plastic baits along channels and around points. Report submitted by Tell Judkins, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

Wes Watkins: July 18. Elevation above normal, water 86 and clear. Channel and blue catfish good on chicken liver, punch bait and worms in creeks with moving water. Crappie slow on minnows around standing timber. White bass fair on sassy shad and lipless baits in the main lake.  Report submitted by Mike France, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County.
 
NORTHEAST
 
Bell Cow: July 17. Elevation normal, water 88 and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-12 ft. around docks and brush structure. Channel catfish fair on worms, crawfish and shad along riprap and shorelines. Largemouth bass slow on in-line spinnerbait and plastic baits around weed beds and along shorelines. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Birch: July 18. Elevation normal, water 80s and clear. Striped bass hybrids good on crankbaits and sunfish around coves and docks. Bluegill sunfish fair on worms around docks and along shorelines. Report submitted by Ryan Walker, game warden stationed in Osage County.
 
Chandler: July 17. Elevation normal, water 88 and murky. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows around docks and boat ramps. Sunfish good on worms around boat ramps. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.
 
Copan: July 18. Elevation normal, water 70s and clearing. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait and worms at 4-6 ft. in creek channels and along riprap. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.
 
Ft. Gibson: July 16. Elevation above normal, water 89 and stained. Blue, channel and flathead catfish good on live shad at 25-40 ft. in the main lake and river channel. Crappie good on tube jigs and minnows at 10-15 ft. around brush structure and docks. White bass good on in-line spinnerbait and crankbaits at 6-15 ft. around points. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits, crankbaits and tube jigs at 5-15 ft. around coves and along riprap. Report submitted by Rick Stafford, Ft. Gibson.
 
Greenleaf: July 18. Elevation normal, water clear. Black bass fair on spinner baits, crankbaits, bill baits, spoons and worms around moss beds, along shorelines, creek channel and around brush structure. Crappie fair at 8-16 ft. around docks and brush structure. Catfish good on fresh cut bait on bottom. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hudson: July 17. Elevation above normal, water 80. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, topwater lures and spinnerbaits at 5-14 ft. around coves, weed beds and riprap. White bass good on crankbaits, small lures and sassy shad at 7-16 ft. below the dam, in the main lake and around points. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Mayes County.
 
Hulah: July 18. Elevation normal, water 70s and clearing. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on chicken liver, worms and cut bait at 4-6 ft. along creek channels, rip rap and around rocks. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Kaw: July 19. Elevation dropping, water 92 and muddy. White bass and crappie fair on jigs, topwater lures and slabs along riprap and bridges. Walleye, striped bass and striped bass hybrids slow on jigs and sassy shad below the dam. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Kay County.

Keystone: July 18. Elevation above normal, water 81. Striped bass good on live bait in channels. Blue catfish good on cut bait in channels. Report submitted by Karlin Bailey, game warden stationed in Creek County.
 
Lower Illinois: July 17. Elevation normal, water 60 with good visibility. Trout good on Powerbait in tailwater, Watts area near deep holes and riffles. Report submitted by Jeremy Bersche, game warden stationed in Sequoyah County.
 
Skiatook: July 19. Elevation below normal, water upper 80s and clear. Striped bass hybrids and white bass fair on live shad at 10-20 ft. in the main lake. Crappie fair on jigs and minnow at 5-15 ft. along creek channels. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Sooner: July 18. Elevation normal, water clear. Striped bass hybrids and striped bass good on live shad and slabs in the main lake. Flathead catfish fair on cut bait and white perch. Channel catfish fair on cut bait in the main lake. Water is being pumped into the lake, fishing is good on the north end of the dam. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County.
 
Tenkiller: July 17. Elevation 0.5 ft. above normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on jigs, plastic baits and spinnerbaits at 15-20 ft. around brush structure, in the main lake and around points. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on cut bait, stinkbait, shad and worms at 15-40 ft. around flats, points and along creek channels. Fish deep flats with flipflops, shad, cut bait or worms. Fish points with stinkbait at 17-21 ft. Drift with shad, liver or worms. Sunfish good on worms, small lures and jigs at 10-20 ft. along shorelines, around docks and brush structure. Report submitted by Monte Brooks, Cookson.
 
Webbers Falls: July 18. Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Black bass fair on spinner baits, crankbaits, bill baits around creek channels, riprap and brush structure. Crappie fair at 10-15 ft. around bridges and brush structure. Catfish good on cut bait and sunfish. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.
 
NORTHWEST
 
Foss: July 18. Elevation 3 ft. below normal, water 78. Striped bass hybrid slow on jigs and live bait around fishing docks. White bass slow on live bait. Walleye slow. Catfish fair on trot lines with liver or cut shad. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Supply:  July 18. Elevation normal, water murky. Channel catfish slow on chicken liver below the dam. All fishing is slow. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Woodward County.
 
SOUTHEAST
 
Broken Bow: July 16. Elevation below normal, water 82. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on Alabama rigs and plastic baits at 15-20 ft around brush structure, standing timber and points. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on chicken liver, worms and punch bait at 5-15 ft. around brush structure, riprap and along the river channel. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.
 
Eufaula: July 17. Elevation normal, water clearing. Striped bass good on flukes, shad and hair jigs below the dam. Flathead catfish good on sunfish and live shad along riprap, around rocks and in shallows. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around docks and bridges. White bass good on Alabama rigs and jigs along riprap and points. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and plastic baits around points and coves. Report submitted by Cody Jones, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.  

Hugo: July 16. Elevation normal, water 85. Blue and channel catfish fair on shad at 5-15 ft. below the dam and along the river channel. Crappie slow on minnows at 10-25 ft. along creek channels, the river channel and around standing timber. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.
 
Konawa: July 18. Elevation normal, water 94 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits, topwater lures and spoons at 3-8 ft. around coves, weed beds and points. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver, worms, stinkbait and punch bait at 4-10 ft. in channels, around inlet and points. White bass fair on crankbaits, worms, slabs and jigs at 8-16 ft. around coves, inlets and in the main lake. Report submitted by Tyler Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

Lower Mountain Fork: July 18. Elevation normal, water 76. Trout good on small lures and Powerbait along creek channels. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Lower Mountain Fork: July 13. Stocked approximately 4,785 rainbow trout on July 7. Report submitted by April Drake, secretary at the Southeast Regional Office. 

McGee Creek: July 17. Elevation normal, water 89 and clear. Crappie fair on minnows at 14-20 ft. around brush structure. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on topwater lures along shorelines and in the main lake. Fishing is best early and late along shorelines on topwater lures and early and late on shad colored topwater lures and rattletraps for schooling bass in open water. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.
 
Murray: July 18. Elevation normal, water 82 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on topwater lures, plastic baits and crankbaits from the surface to 15 ft. of water around points, weed beds and in the main lake. White bass fair on jigs, minnows, sassy shad and crankbaits from the surface to 12 ft. of water in the main lake, around points and creek channels. Channel catfish fair on crawfish, shrimp, worms and shad at 4-15 ft. around rocks, along riprap and creek channels. Sunfish fair on jigs, worms, minnows and small lures at 3-8 ft. around docks weed beds and the sand bar. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.
 
Pine Creek: July 18. Elevation normal, water 86 and clear. Crappie excellent on jigs around brush structure and along the river channel. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits around points. Channel catfish good on worms and stink bait along creek channels and in the main lake. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.
 
Robert S. Kerr: July 17. Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on Alabama rigs, flukes and plastic baits around point, rocks and along riprap. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait, live bait and stink bait along channels and flats. Striped and white bass fair on live shad, live bait and bill baits along the river channel. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Haskell County.   

Sardis: July 16. Elevation normal, water 88. Crappie fair on jigs, hair jigs and minnows at 6-14 ft. around brush structure and standing timber. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on bill baits, buzz baits, spinner baits and topwater lures at 4-12 ft. around brush structure, weed beds and rocks. Blue, channel and flathead catfish good on cut bait, sunfish and shad at 6-12 ft. along channels, shorelines and in the main lake. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.
 
Texoma: July 17. Elevation normal, water 87-89 and stained. Striped bass slow on live shad at 35 ft. below the dam, along the river channel and in the main lake. White bass fair on topwater lures and live shad at 5-10 ft. along creek channels, the river channel and riprap. Blue and channel catfish excellent on live shad and cut bait at 5-30 ft. below the dam, in the river mouth and along the river channel. Paddlefish excellent below the dam. Report submitted by Bob Wingo, game warden stationed in Bryan County.
 
Wister: July 17. Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater lures and spinnerbaits at 3-14 ft. around brush structure. Crappie fair on jigs at 10-20 ft. around brush structure. Flathead catfish fair on live bait at 12-25 ft. along channels. Fishing is best early in the morning and late at night. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in Le Flore County. 
 
SOUTHWEST
 
Ft. Cobb: July 19. Elevation normal, water 88. Channel and blue catfish fair on chicken liver, shrimp and cut bait in coves and the main lake. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow on live bait and live shad around points and in the main lake. Report submitted by John Grellner, game warden stationed in Caddo County.
 
Tom Steed: July 18. Elevation normal, water 75. Striped bass hybrids and saugeye slow trolling crankbaits in the main lake. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County.
 
Waurika: July 17. Elevation normal, water 80. Blue and channel catfish fair on chicken liver, stinkbait and cut bait below the dam, along shorelines and riprap. Report submitted by Chris Stover, game warden stationed in Stephens County.

Iowa Weekly Fishing Report 7/21/2016

English: Stringer of bluegills taken from Bilb...

This weekly fishing report is compiled from information gathered from local bait shops, angler creel surveys, and county and state parks staff. For current information, contact the district fisheries office at the phone number listed at the end of each district report.

Stay Where You Play

Make your next fishing trip an overnight stay. Take advantage of state park cabins and campgrounds near many of these bodies of water. Some of Iowa’s best fishing is happening this spring. Make your reservation now. For more information on availability and rates, visitiowastateparks.reserveamerica.com

NORTHWEST

Arrowhead Lake
Bluegill - Good: Anglers are catching 8 - 9.5 inch bluegills in about 5 feet of water with a black jig tipped with a wax worm fished about 3 feet below a bobber.
Black Hawk Lake
Water level is about 10 inches over the crest of the spillway. Bluegill - Good: Bluegill fishing is good in 1-4 feet of water. Use a small jig tipped with live bait, small piece of crawler or wax worms fished below a bobber. Walleye - Slow: Try the shore off Ice House Point, the dredge cut out from Denison Beach and the rock piles near Gunshot Hill and in the east basin of the lake. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Use top water, weedless baits or Texas rigs. Try also fishing plastic worms near cover and drop offs. There is a 15-inch minimum length limit for largemouth bass on Black Hawk Lake. Channel Catfish - Fair: Fish stink bait, leeches and worms on the bottom. A recent netting survey showed that catfish are up to 23 inches and 5 lbs.  in Black Hawk Lake.
Blue LakeWe have received no information regarding fishing on this water body this week. Largemouth Bass - No Report: With the water levels up, there is a lot of shoreline vegetation submerged. Concentrate on these areas with weedless lures. Bluegill - No Report: Fish a worm under a bobber near vegetation. Some sorting is required because there are a lot of smaller fish.
Brushy Creek Lake
Bluegill - Fair: Anglers are picking up some bluegills in 15-20 feet of water. Black Crappie - Fair: Fish in 10-20 feet of water with a small piece of crawler or minnow on a jig. Walleye - Fair: Fish in 15-20 feet of water.
Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake)
The dredge is in operation in the northeast portion of the lake. Boaters should use extreme caution in this area and must maintain a 100 foot distance from the dredge, booster pump and all dredge pipes at all times. Storm Lake has a daily limit of 3 walleye and all 17 to 22-inch walleye must be released; no more than one walleye longer than 22 inches may be taken per day. Walleye - Fair: Most of the walleye action has been on crankbaits fished in the dredge cuts. A few have been picked up from shore with leeches and crankbaits. Channel Catfish - Fair: Anglers are catching catfish from shore using stink bait or cut bait fished off the bottom.
Swan Lake
Bluegill - Fair: Anglers are picking up bluegills near shore along weed lines. Fish a small jig under a bobber with a small piece of crawler, wax worm or minnow for bait. A recent electrofishing survey showed bluegills up to 9 inches.
For more information contact the Black Hawk District Office at 712-657-2638.

Beeds Lake
Bluegill - Good: Bluegills and a few yellows are being caught drift fishing/trolling small jigs.  
Clear Lake
Channel Catfish - Fair: Catfish have been caught near the state rock reef and after dark on the Ventura jetties. Yellow Bass - Good: Yellow bass fishing has been fair to good. Drift fish the main lake until you find a school; mark the area and swing back through again. Or try some of the rock reefs. Walleye - Fair: A few walleyes are being caught early and late in the day near the Baptist camp area in the weeds. A few have been caught near the artificial reefs (HyVee and Fisherman’s). Muskellunge – Fair. Black Crappie - Fair: Try the artificial weed beds (Fisherman’s and HyVee reefs).
Lake Catherine
Channel Catfish - Good: Try along the jetties or shoreline with worms, minnows or cut bait.
Lake Cornelia
Channel Catfish - Good: A few decent catfish have been caught at dusk or night from shore. Try a piece of cut bait, stink bait or a live chub. Bluegill - Good: Smaller bluegills and yellow bass are being caught along the shore with night crawlers.
Lake Smith
Channel Catfish - Good: Catfish are on the rocks on the south end. Try bobbers and a piece of cut bait or worms. Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth fishing has been good in the weeds and on deeper water structure. Use artificial bait that works well in weeds; fish pockets in the weeds or edges. Bluegill - Fair: Anglers have had fair success with bluegills and crappies out from shore.
For lake updates and fishing information in the north central area, contact the Clear Lake Fish and Wildlife office at 641-357-3517.

Big Spirit Lake
Yellow Perch - Good: Report of good numbers of fish caught; sorting will result in nice numbers in the creel.
Center Lake
Black Crappie - Good: Good numbers of crappies and bluegills are reported in the shoreline wooden habitat; use mini jigs tipped with wigglers or a worm.
East Okoboji Lake
Black Crappie - Good: Cast small jig lures tipped with bait on the wooden docks. Yellow Bass - Good: Good action early morning and evenings; fish bridge sites for the best action.
Lost Island Lake
Yellow Bass - Good: Boat anglers are catching good numbers; fish vertically with a jig tipped with wigglers. Dock anglers casting jigs will produce numbers; fish evening hours for the best action.
Silver Lake (Dickinson)
Walleye - Good: The walleye bite has slowed but boat anglers are harvesting nice fish; troll crankbaits for the best action.
West Okoboji Lake
Black Crappie - Good: Good bluegill and crappie action reported fishing the deeper wooden docks; best action is during the evening hours.
For more information on the above lakes, call the Spirit Lake Fisheries Station at 712-336-1840.

NORTHEAST

Cedar River (above Nashua)Cedar River crested earlier this week and is slowly falling. Water is very dirty. Use caution when boating as submersed logs and other debris may not be visible. Walleye – Fair. Channel Catfish - Slow: Anglers fishing in current breaks and eddies are finding catfish. Use cut bait on a hook. Northern Pike - Slow: Minnows are turning pikes heads. Rock Bass - Slow: Catches of rock bass have been spotty.
Decorah District StreamsTrout streams with better watersheds are fishable but flows are up. Take care when walking through wild parsnip while getting to your favorite stream. Don't let it touch your skin; it reacts with the sun and causes horrible blisters.  Brown Trout - Good: A nice variety of insects have been hatching in the evenings. Use a #18 blue wing olive or #14 or #16 caddis fly imitation. Strong midges hatches are also occurring. Brook Trout - Good: For stained water, use a streamer or minnow imitation. Rainbow Trout - Good: A few of our streams are not stocked in July and August as these streams tend to get too warm for cold water fish. Refer to our calendar and mapto find out which ones. Spin fishers should try spinners or worms.
Lake Hendricks
The lake has a green algae bloom, but anglers are still catching fish. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Anglers fishing from a boat or canoe are having luck using topwater plastics over the vegetation and reeling to deeper water. Bluegill - Fair: Shore fishing is difficult due to aquatic beds. Find fish in deeper water; use a hook tipped with small piece of worm. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try cut bait, worms and stinkbait fished off the bottom.
Lake MeyerExpect spotty catches of fish depending on day and time. The Algae bloom is becoming more evident. Bluegill - Fair: Gills are in shallow dense vegetation and are difficult to catch. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Use a jig tipped with a variety of soft plastics. Start along the weed edges and fish deeper. Channel Catfish - Fair: Catfish are taking a big worm fished off the bottom under a bobber; evenings are best.
Upper Iowa River (above Decorah)Water temperatures are in the 70's. Water levels have stabilized, but the river remains very muddy. Smallmouth Bass - Slow: Try running a spinner bait along undercut banks and overhanging rock ledges.
Upper Iowa River (below Decorah)Water levels have stabilized, but clarity is poor. Use care when paddling; logs, rocks, and other debris may not be visible until it's too late to maneuver. Smallmouth Bass - Slow: Spinnerbaits were turning smallie heads. Walleye – Slow.
Volga Lake
Volga Lake has a green algae bloom. Anglers drifting over rock or brush piles will find fish. Largemouth Bass – Fair. Black Crappie – Fair. Bluegill – Fair.
A chance for stormy weather continues through the weekend. Be careful when outside. There are excessive heat warnings for our area Thursday and Friday. Most river levels remain elevated and are very muddy with recent rains. For more information, please call the Decorah Fish Hatchery at 563-382-8324.

Cedar River (Nashua to La Porte City)
The Cedar River is rising; there currently are no reports. Channel catfish may be the best opportunity at this time. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try stink baits, cut baits or chicken livers.
Manchester District StreamsRecent fish sampling surveys on the Upper Maquoketa River (Trout Portion) has shown good numbers of brown trout with many of quality size. Brown Trout - Fair: Use spinners or dry flies concentrating efforts near overhead cover and other habitat.
Maquoketa River (above Monticello)
The Maquoketa River is in excellent angling condition for the upcoming weekend. Walleye - Fair: A jig tipped with a crawler is a deadly combination this time of year. Look for current breaks and woody structure. Smallmouth Bass - Fair: Use a jig and crawler, crankbaits or spinner baits fished near rocky habitat. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try chicken livers or stink baits near the upstream end of logjams.
Shell Rock River (Greene to Shell Rock)
The Shell Rock River is rising; there currently are no reports. Channel catfish may be the best opportunity at this time. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try stink baits, cut baits or chicken livers.
Wapsipinicon River (Tripoli to Troy Mills)The Wapsipinicon River is rising; there currently are no reports. Channel catfish may be the best opportunity at this time. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try stink baits, cut baits or chicken livers.
Most interior rivers are on the rise due to recent rainfall; fishing reports have declined due to the recent heat and humidity. Channel catfish may be the best angling opportunity on the rivers for the upcoming weekend. Panfish reports have been slow as we are in the mid-summer lulls. Trout streams are in excellent condition and recent fish sampling has shown quality brown trout populations. For further information, contact the N.E. District Office at 563-927-3276.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER

Mississippi River Pool 9
Water level is 11.5 feet at Lansing and is expected to rise another foot over the next week. Access to the boat ramp at New Albin may be closed. Water temperature remains in the upper 70's. Freshwater Drum - Excellent: Drum are feeding well on worms bounced on the bottom. Reports of larger drum being caught on minnows. Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth fishing is good alongside channel and main channel structure. Channel Catfish - Excellent: Channel catfish spawning has mostly ended; use stink bait. Look for catfish in shallow stump beds or snags in side channels. Bluegill - Good: Bluegills will be scattered with the higher water levels. Fish a bit of crawler under bobbers in slack water still holding vegetation. Walleye - Good: Walleye bite is good on the wing dams and deep closing dams trolling a crankbait or a crawler rig above the wing dams. Smallmouth Bass - Excellent: Smallmouth fishing remains good along rocky shorelines and wing dams at dawn and early evening. Yellow Perch - Fair: A lot of yellow perch are hanging along weed lines in the back waters and slow moving side channels.
Mississippi River Pool 10
Water level is 19 feet at Lynxville and is expected to reach 20.5 feet this week. Water temperature is in the upper 70's. Freshwater Drum - Excellent: Drum are feeding well on worms bounced on the bottom. Reports of larger drum being caught on minnows. Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth fishing is good alongside channel and main channel structure. Channel Catfish - Excellent: Channel catfish spawning has mostly ended; use stink bait. Look for catfish in shallow stump beds or snags in side channels. Bluegill - Good: Bluegills will be scattered with the higher water levels. Fish a bit of crawler under bobbers in slack water still holding vegetation. Walleye - Good: Walleye bite is good on the wing dams and deep closing dams trolling a crankbait or a crawler rig above the wing dams. Smallmouth Bass - Excellent: Smallmouth fishing remains good along rocky shorelines and wing dams at dawn and early evening. Yellow Perch - Fair: A lot of yellow perch are hanging along weed lines in the back waters and slow moving side channels.
Mississippi River Pool 11
Water level has risen 4 feet at Lock and Dam 10 at Guttenberg in the past week to near 10 feet. Levels are expected to reach 11.2 feet late next week before leveling off. Water temperature remains in the upper 70's. Freshwater Drum - Excellent:  Drum are feeding well on worms bounced on the bottom. Reports of larger drum being caught on minnows. Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth fishing is good alongside channel and main channel structure. Channel Catfish - Excellent: Channel catfish spawning has mostly ended; use stink bait. Look for catfish in shallow stump beds or snags in side channels. Bluegill - Good: Bluegills will be scattered with the higher water levels. Fish a bit of crawler under bobbers in slack water still holding vegetation. Walleye - Good: Walleye bite is good on the wing dams and deep closing dams trolling a crankbait or a crawler rig above the wing dams. Smallmouth Bass - Excellent: Smallmouth fishing remains good along rocky shorelines and wing dams at dawn and early evening. Yellow Perch - Fair: A lot of yellow perch are hanging along weed lines in the back waters and slow moving side channels.
Water levels are up several feet over the past week on the Upper Mississippi. Lock and Dam gates are open at Lynxville and Guttenberg. The rapid rise in water levels will create excessive current and vegetation movement. Anglers may have to search for fish in side channel and backwater refuges. Water temperatures remain in the upper 70's.

Mississippi River Pool 12
Water level is near 9.0 feet at Dubuque tailwater and near 11.2 feet at the RR bridge.  These levels are up significantly from last week and water levels are expected to continue to rise. Tributaries such as Catfish Creek are very turbid. Water temperature in the main channel is 77 degrees. Walleye - Good: Try fishing the wing dams closer to bank as the water current picks up its pace this week. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Try fishing the vegetation lines or in pockets of large coontail and milfoil weed beds. Frog imitation lures can work great this time of year. Freshwater Drum - Excellent: Lots of freshwater drum can be caught. Cut out all the red meat when cleaning them and they are a fine eating fish. Throw them immediately on ice after catching them, if you plan on eating drum. Channel Catfish - Excellent: Lots of catfish are being caught off rock lines and piles. Those bluish looking catfish are NOT blue catfish, rather the male channel cat in spawning colors. Catfish are nearing the end of their spawning run. Bluegill - Fair: Some bluegills are showing up usually near areas of slight flow.  They are running small this year. Smallmouth Bass - Good: Smallmouth bass are doing very well in the Mississippi River with numerous year classes present.  The combination of rock and current are a must to find smallmouth bass, which often hold very tight to the rocks. Black Crappie - Good: Some early in the year reports of anglers taking some nice crappies out of brush piles.
Mississippi River Pool 13
Water level is near 9.3 feet at Bellevue which is up a couple of feet from last week. The water temperature is around 79 degrees. Expect water to rise during the week. Mill Creek and the Maquoketa River are muddy; avoid them if possible. Walleye - Good: Walleyes were back on the wing dams; they may move when the river levels increase. Try fishing near shore on the wing dams in areas of lesser current. Largemouth Bass - Good: Go way back in large backwater complexes to find cleaner water; this is where the bass will be. Fish along the eel grass. Use frog imitation lures or plastics. Freshwater Drum - Excellent: Loads of freshwater drum are being caught, many from bank anglers. Use large crayfish to catch really large drum. Channel Catfish - Excellent: Use stink bait in flowing sloughs, especially above log jams or along rock piles. Catfish bite usually improves with rising water levels. Smallmouth Bass - Good: Smallmouth bass are doing very well in the Mississippi River with numerous year classes present. The combination of rock and current are a must to find smallmouth bass, which often hold very tight to the rocks. Stay away from the turbid tributary streams as smallmouth are sight feeders.
Mississippi River Pool 14
Water level is near 8.7 feet at Fulton, 12.0 feet at Camanche and 6.2 feet at LeClaire. These readings are predicted well up from last week. Water is expected to rise all week. The water clarity is still somewhat turbid, especially around the Wapsipinicon River mouth. Freshwater Drum - Excellent: The drum bite is on. Simple sliding sinker and worms fished in current work best. Channel Catfish - Excellent: The catfish bite is very good. Most anglers are using crawlers when drum fishing but some f are using stink bait. The Rock Creek area is a good place to find channel cats. Rising water levels usually triggers a catfish bite. Walleye - Fair: Walleyes were biting during the lower current levels. Smallmouth Bass - Good: Smallmouth bass are doing very well in the Mississippi River with numerous year classes present. The combination of rock and current are a must to find smallmouth bass, which often hold very tight to the rocks.
Mississippi River Pool 15
Water level is 8.2 feet at Rock Island, which is up substantially from last week. Expect water levels to rise all week. Water temperature is around 79 degrees in the main channel. Pigeon Creek and Crow Creek are turbid after nearly every rain this year. Freshwater Drum - Excellent: Freshwater drum are abundant in Pool 15 and can easily be caught from shore. Try fishing the eagles landing area a with worm and egg sinkers. Channel Catfish - Good: Rising water levels usually trigger what has already been a good catfish bite. Lots of varieties of stink bait are being used.  
Water temperatures are in the upper 70's throughout the district. Water levels are predicted to raise. River turbidity has been an issue near tributary streams which continue to be muddy. Some caddis and mayflies are hatching almost every night.  

Mississippi River Pool 16
Tailwater stage is 9.16 feet at Lock and Dam 15 in the Quad Cities. Tailwater stage has risen the past few days and is forecasted to continue to rise throughout the weekend. Tailwater stage is forecasted to reach 11.1 feet by the middle of next week. Flood stage is 15 feet. Channel Catfish - Fair: Channel catfish are being caught on stink baits. Try fishing above logs jams and snags in the side channels. Bluegill - Fair: Some bluegills are being caught in the backwaters. Look for bluegills around brush piles and logs. Try fishing with pieces of worms under a bobber. White Bass - Slow: White bass fishing below the dam and in Sylvan Slough has been hit or miss.
Mississippi River Pool 17
Tailwater stage is 7.40 feet at Lock and Dam 16 in Muscatine and is rising. River stage is forecasted to reach 10.2 feet by the middle of next week. Flood stage is 15 feet. We have not received any fishing reports for this pool this week. Channel Catfish - No Report: Look for channel catfish around log jams and snags in the side channels. Try night crawlers or stink bait. White Bass - No Report: Look for white bass on the wing dams. Cast crankbaits or jigs and twister tails. Bluegill - No Report: Look for bluegills in the backwaters. Try fishing around brush piles and logs with pieces of worm under a bobber.
Mississippi River Pool 18
Tailwater stage is 9.12 feet at Lock and Dam 17 above New Boston and is rising. Tailwater stage is forecasted to reach 11.8 feet over the weekend. White Crappie - Fair: Some crappies are being caught in New Boston Bay. Try fishing around brush piles and the bridge. White Bass - Fair: White bass are being caught on the wing dams. Cast crankbaits or jigs and twister tails. Channel Catfish - No Report: Use stink baits above brush piles and log jams in the side channels.
Mississippi River Pool 19
Tailwater stage is 5.63 feet at Lock and Dam 19 above Burlington and is rising. Tailwater stage is forecasted to reach 8 feet over the weekend. Flood stage is 10 feet. We have not received any fishing report information for this pool this week. Channel Catfish - No Report: Use stink baits above brush piles and log jams in the side channels.
Pools 16-19: River stages have been on the rise with the recent heavy rains and forecasted to continue to rise through the weekend. Water clarity is fair to poor. Main channel water temperature is around 80 degrees. We have not received many fishing reports with the rising water conditions and hotter weather. Remember to clean, drain, and dry your boat before going to another waterbody. If you have questions on fishing pools 16-19, contact the Fairport Fish Hatchery at 563-263-5062.

SOUTHEAST

Big Hollow Lake
Water temperature on Wednesday was down to 80 degrees after the heavy rains. A lot of the duck weed is gone. Bluegill - Fair: Anglers are catching some nice sized bluegills in deeper water out around the flooded timber. Channel Catfish - Good: Get up in the areas where runoff is coming into the lake and you will find some really nice catfish.
Iowa River (Columbus Junction to Mississippi River)
The forecast is for the Iowa River to come up a couple another feet by Sunday afternoon. Channel Catfish - Good: Catfishing continues to be pretty good on a variety of baits; concentrate efforts on the mouths of feeder creeks.
Lake Belva Deer
Not very many anglers out due to the weather. Bluegill - Good: Fish in deeper water around the flooded timber. They don’t seem to be coming in shallow even in the early morning. Largemouth Bass - Good: Bass fishing has been good early in the morning at the upper end of the lake. Work the brush piles and over top of the mounds.
Lake Darling
Water temperatures are up in the mid 80's. Bluegill - Fair: Work the banks along where the campground arm of the lake attaches to the main body of the lake. Try also around where the deeper water comes near the jetties and fishing pier.
Lake Geode
Water temperature was cooled down a little by the rain. Bluegill - Fair: Bluegill fishing has slowed with the hot humid weather and rain. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try the upper end of the lake where the runoff is coming down Cedar Creek.
Lake Odessa
Because of the rise in the water level out in the Mississippi River, the inlet and outlet gates have been closed at Odessa to prevent its water level from coming back up.
Skunk River (Rose Hill to Coppock)
The river has come up about a foot from the recent rains and it's pretty muddy. There hasn’t been many anglers out on the river the last few days.
For more information on the above lakes and rivers, call the Lake Darling Fisheries Office at 319-694-2430.

Coralville Reservoir
The lake is at normal summer pool. Channel Catfish - Fair: Slow troll or drift cut bait in the channel.
Diamond Lake
No minnows are allowed here. Channel Catfish - Good: Fish around sunrise/sunset with stink bait or chicken livers. Bluegill - Fair: Look for fish around offshore brush piles. Black Crappie - Fair: Fish around deeper brush or drift open water for suspended fish.
Iowa River (Marshalltown to Coralville Lake)
Channel Catfish - Good: Stink bait and live bait work well around snags. Flathead Catfish - Good: Use bullheads, sunfish and chubs around snags.
Lake Macbride
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Pleasant Creek Lake
The lake is currently 9' low. The main ramp is still usable. White Bass - Fair: Look for fish feeding on the surface towards sunset. There are often some wipers mixed in. Yellow Perch - Fair: Some fish are being caught on worms.
Wapsi River (Troy Mills to Oxford Junction)
Channel Catfish - Good: Most typical catfish baits are working. Focus around woody snags in the river.
For additional information, contact the Lake Macbride Fisheries Station at 319-624-3615.

Bob White Lake
A complete fisheries renovation was completed in September of 2015. Fingerlings were stocked last fall. Fishing will continue to improve as the fish grow.
Hawthorn Lake
Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth bass fishing has been good. Use crankbaits or spinner baits around brush piles and other underwater structure. Try rubber worms or crawdad imitations around the rock jetties and along the dam. Hawthorn has a slot limit and all largemouth bass between 12 and 16 inches must be immediately released. Black Bullhead - Good: Use nightcrawler fished on the bottom. Bluegill - Fair: Bluegills are biting on small jigs tipped with a chunk of night crawler. Sorting is needed for larger fish with most fish running about 7 inches.
Lake Keomah
Try crankbaits and spinnerbaits fished around the end of the rock jetties for largemouth bass. Use small jigs tipped with a chunk of night crawler for bluegill. Try areas around the aquatic vegetation near the shorelines.
Lake Sugema
Largemouth Bass - Fair: Use topwater lures in the early mornings and later in the evenings. Try spinner baits around the fishing jetties and along the face of the dam. Lake Sugema has a slot limit, so all largemouth bass 12-18 inches must be immediately released. Black Crappie - Fair: Use jig and minnow combinations. Try different colors and different depths until you find active fish. Target areas in the flooded timber. Walleye - Slow: Fishing has slowed some with the hotter weather. Drift night crawlers or minnows along the dam and other rip-rapped shorelines.
Lake Wapello
Largemouth Bass - Good: Try crankbaits and topwater lures. Target the cedar trees piles and open areas along the aquatic vegetation. Channel Catfish - Fair: Anglers are catching channel catfish using cut bait or night crawlers. Black Bullhead - Fair: Use night crawlers fished near the bottom. Fish along the shorelines in 4-6 feet of water.
Rathbun Reservoir
The current lake level is 905.84. The current surface water temperature is in the low 80's. Lake Rathbun contains zebra mussels, so make sure to properly drain, clean, and dry equipment before transporting to another water body. Channel Catfish - Fair: Channel catfish are biting on night crawlers and cut bait. Walleye anglers are also catching catfish on crankbaits. Walleye - Fair: Anglers are catching walleyes by trolling crankbaits or crawler harnesses around rock piles and submerged points. Use crankbaits that mimic gizzard shad. Try also casting jigs in the shallows. White Bass - Good: Anglers are catching white bass with chrome colored crankbaits or lead heads and white jigs. Rathbun also contains hybrid striped bass (wipers); use the same techniques used for white bass.
Red Haw Lake
Bluegill - Fair: Try a chunk of nightcrawler fished under a bobber; target areas along the shorelines. Largemouth Bass - Good: Target areas with rock on the shorelines and around the fishing jetties using spinner baits or rubber worms. Try also crawdad imitations. Channel Catfish - Fair: Use cut bait or night crawlers along the shorelines. Target areas with rocks such as along the dam or around the fishing jetties.
Take your trash with you so your favorite fishing spot is clean and litter free. Contact the Rathbun Fish Hatchery at 641-647-2406 with questions regarding angling in south central Iowa.

SOUTHWEST

Big Creek Lake
Walleye - Fair: Troll spinner rigs with minnows or crawlers in 5-15 feet of water. Focus on the upper/shallower 1/3rd of the lake. The east arm out from and above the marina has been producing more fish. Flows coming in from the creeks will attract fish to the silt dam notches. Cast shallow diving crankbaits in these areas.
Don Williams Lake
Black Crappie - Good: The good crappie bite continues at Don Williams. Most fish are 8-9 inches. They are not being caught close to shore. Slowly troll or drift 1/8 ounce jigs tipped with minnows or small white or chartreuse twister tails out from shore in 15-20 feet of water in the upper half of the lake. The crappie are suspended from 5 to 10 feet down.
Hickory Grove LakeBlack Crappie - Fair: A fair to good crappie bite has been going at Hickory Grove. They are being caught drifting or slow trolling 1/8 ounce or lighter jigs with twister tails or minnows or 1.5 inch panfish tube jigs. Work the mid-lake area out from the Oriole Ridge Lodge. Bluegill - Good: Use small jigs tipped with crawler over pallet piles in water less than 15 feet deep. Try between the island the beach and near buoy off the shore from the Plover Bay Shelter. Hickory Grove can produce some nice bluegills from 7 to 8.5 inches.
Red Rock ReservoirWhite Bass - Good: Hot weather is keeping a good white bass bite going. Troll points and windblown shorelines with spoons and lipless crankbaits. Popular color patterns include chrome, chrome/blue and firetiger. If trolling is producing little results, cast the same lures shallow to the windblown shoreline and retrieve.
Roberts Creek Lake
Black Crappie - Fair: Crappied are in a suspended summer pattern. Drift or troll small twister tail jigs or tube jigs in the main lake.
Rock Creek Lake
Black Crappie - Fair: Crappie fishing is good. Drift or troll in the lower half of the main lake. Use small tube jigs and 1/16 or 1/8 ounce jigs with twister tails or tipped with minnows. Keep your bait in the top 6 feet of water.
Saylorville Reservoir
White Bass - Excellent: The white bass bite is getting more active during the hot weather. Cast or troll spoons, lipless crankbaits or square bill crankbaits. Color patterns containing chrome or chartreuse work best. Try the stretch from Sandpiper Beach to the marina bay. Channel Catfish - Good: Drift cut creek chubs above the mile long bridge
Catfishing is good right now on Central Iowa rivers. White bass fishing on the reservoirs is good to excellent. For information on Central Iowa lakes and rivers contact, Andy Otting or Ben Dodd at 515-432-2823.

Green Valley Lake
Largemouth Bass - Good: Largemouth bass up to 19 inches have been caught with finesse plastics or tube jigs fished near cedar tree brush piles or along the dam. Bluegill - Slow: Bluegill up to 8.5 inches have been caught using night crawlers fished near cedar tree brush piles.
Lake IcariaChannel Catfish - Good: Channel catfish of all sizes have been caught with night crawlers or liver fished near the fish mounds and other rocky structure. Bluegill - Fair: Bluegill up to 8 inches have been caught using jigs tipped with a wax worm fished near the fish mounds.
Lake of Three FiresBluegill - Slow: Bluegill up to 8 inches have been caught with night crawlers fished near deep cedar tree brush piles.
Little River Watershed Lake
Channel Catfish - Good: Channel catfish of all sizes have been caught with liver or night crawlers fished near the flooded timber. Bluegill - Fair: Bluegill up to 8.5 inches have been caught using jigs tipped with a wax worm fished along the weed line in 15 feet of water. Walleye - Slow: A few walleyes have been caught with jigs fished along the rock fields and main lake points.
Three Mile Lake
Bluegill - Slow: Bluegill up to 7 inches have been caught with night crawlers fished in 15 feet of water along the flooded timber.
Twelve Mile Creek Lake
Bluegill - Slow: Bluegills up to 9 inches have been caught with night crawlers fished along feedlines in 14 feet of water. Yellow Perch - Slow: Yellow perch up to 12 inches have been caught using nightcrawler fished along weed lines in 14 feet of water.
Water temperature in Mount Ayr district lakes is in the low to mid 80's. For more information, please contact the Mount Ayr Fisheries office at 641-464-3108.

MISSOURI RIVER

Missouri River (Sioux City to Little Sioux)
Channel Catfish - Fair: Use cut bait, stink bait or crawlers fished on the bottom. Flathead Catfish - Fair: Try live chubs fished in current breaks near deeper water.
Missouri River (Little Sioux to Council Bluffs)
Channel Catfish - Good: Use cut bait, stink bait or crawlers fished on the bottom. Flathead Catfish - Good: Try live chubs fished in current breaks near deeper water. Shovelnose sturgeon - Slow: Use crawlers fished on the bottom.
Missouri River (Council Bluffs to Missouri State Line)
Channel Catfish - Good: Try cut bait, stink bait or worms fished on the bottom. Blue Catfish - Good: Use cut bait and live chubs. Flathead Catfish - Good: Try live chubs fished in current breaks near deeper water.
The Missouri River at Decatur, Nebraska is at 20.95 ft. /29,900 cfs./ 79 degrees Fahrenheit. The Missouri has risen 0.51 feet from last week. The Missouri River levels and water conditions are looking good to get out and fish